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Apr 19, 2010

When I first saw Sean Stewart’s Rivertown (see the series with an added intro here), I was transported back in time to when I lived in Pittsburgh, PA, a few years ago. In fact, I’m pretty sure I’ve been to the very place in this photo - if I’m not mistaken you drive this road down, take a left, and there’s a thrift shop right there. Or maybe that’s a different road, but the area around Pittsburgh looks just like this, so it could be easily that road.
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Apr 19, 2010

I was going to link to one of the images of Caleb Charland’s odd contraptions, which in reality usually are elaborately produced multiple exposures, when I came across this image. Bam! As much as I like the b/w photos, I really want to see more from this series. Michael Mazzeo writes about Caleb here.
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Apr 14, 2010

Peter Brown’s West of Last Chance shows the landscape and small towns of the Great Plains.
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Apr 13, 2010

“Off the Grid is a study of thirty families living in Maine without electricity, plumbing or phones. Scattered throughout the Maine woods, these homes are disconnected from the grid of wires and media that bind distant Americans together. Although they have all rejected aspects of the modern world, their beliefs and commitments vary widely—ranging from environmentalism to evangelism to anarchism. Yet the families living in these homes—and on the occasional commune—form a sort of makeshift community.” - Keliy Anderson-Staley
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Apr 12, 2010

Many of Jason Koxvold’s photographs offer glimpses of a pretty bleak world - our modern world.
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Apr 12, 2010

John Clendenen’s Science Fiction is in dire need of a bit of editing and sequencing (you’ll have to keep clicking through the images since they’re sorted by “style”), but I really like where it’s going; and it almost has a bit of a Japanese photography feel to it (think Kikuji Kawada’s Chizu).
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Apr 8, 2010

Mark Lyon’s Landscapes For The People shows landscape photographs being used as, say, backdrops for dentist offices. Great work.
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Apr 7, 2010

“While Israel is defined as the Jewish state, over a fifth of its population is Arab […] Wishing to examine forward-looking aspects of this Arab-Jewish coexistence, I decided to focus on Arab men and women at a crucial point in their lives - turning eighteen years old. […] I aim to confront, and dispute widespread misconceptions of the ‘other,’ those people within my own country whom I was brought up to consider more as foes than as allies.” - Natan Dvir (via, where more text and large images can be found)
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Apr 7, 2010

There’s a lot of very beautiful landscape photography on Dalton Rooney’s website, in particular Outer Lands and Fire Island.
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Apr 6, 2010

What I like about Michael Corridore’s Angry Black Snake is that from most photographs you can’t really tell what’s going on (where does all that smoke come from?), so you’re simply looking at those few people you can make out against the smoke (or embedded in it).
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Apr 6, 2010

You might know Justine Reyes’ Vanitas series. When she showed me her work, I was struck by the immense power of some of her portraits, though (from Home, Away From Home).
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Apr 5, 2010

About her work, Tanya Habjouqa says “I want to provoke the audience to reflect on regional social issues, stereotypes, and realities. The perpetual images of blood, suffering, and conflict are not the only defining characteristics of the Middle East. I aim to find the balance between jarring a misrepresentation of Arabs through a perpetual lens of violence while simultaneously tell stories that prompt Middle Easterners to nod in recognition, yet still challenge all audiences with the contradictions of a region in flux balancing its traditions.” (source/via) Her series Women of Gaza is remarkable in many different ways.
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Mar 31, 2010

Jeff Wall’s The Destroyed Room is a well known (staged) photograph, described here as follows: “Wall echoes Delacroix’s composition, with its central sweeping diagonal and sumptuous palette of blood reds, while acknowledging its staged atmosphere by re-composing the scene as a roughly fabricated stage-set, absent of any players.” The people who lived in the rooms depicted by Dalia Khamissy were probably less interested in whether their bombed-out living quarters evoked any of Delacroix’s compositions. (via)
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Mar 18, 2010

For some reason that’s not clear to me I prefer Gerald Slota’s b/w work over the colour one. It’s maybe a somewhat different approach to walking into that dark alley that Roger Ballen has been investigating, coming from another end. Also see this page (for some more colour work).
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Mar 16, 2010

Gayle Chong Kwan is another artist to have re-done Caspar David Friedrich’ The Sea of Ice (also see Hiroyuki Masuyama). Yes, this is cheese. (thanks, Sara!)
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Mar 10, 2010

Just like Thomas Ruff’s well-known portraits, Hein-kuhn Oh’s Cosmetic Girls asks the viewer to try to look beyond make-up, poses, and photographic conventions. Also, don’t miss the older, b/w, work!
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Mar 9, 2010

No, this is not a painting, or actually the painting. It’s a digital recreation, using 700 individual photos, assembled by Hiroyuki Masuyama. For more on the artist and his process check out this page and this one.
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Mar 4, 2010

In Without A Face, Isabella Demavlys portrays the victims of acid attacks in Pakistan. In places like India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and now also Afghanistan, acid attacks have become a common form of violence against women.
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Feb 24, 2010

This image is from Gregory Halpern’s Thin on the Ground, but also make sure to have a look at Living Wage Campaign.
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Feb 18, 2010

Heather McClintock has been taking photographs in Uganda for a few years now, covering the civil war in the northern part of the country. If you’ve never even heard of that war, you’re not alone. One of Foreign Policy magazine’s The Top 10 Stories You Missed in 2009, at number 9, is America Joins Uganda’s Civil War. Find more about the civil war here.
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Feb 10, 2010

David Pollock’s Sign, Symbol and Nature shows just that: Our modern (Western) world, with its displays of often fake or heavily trimmed nature (where it’s not just cheaply reproduced on wall paintings), generic buildings, and more.
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Feb 9, 2010

I saw Gian Paolo Minelli’s work over at The Black Snapper the other day, but I didn’t manage to dig up much more about his work other than this page.
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Feb 4, 2010

I’ll admit that Alaska is probably the US state I know the least about, so I enjoyed seeing Ben Huff’s (work in progress) The Last Road North.
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Feb 2, 2010

I was going to write something about Matthew Robert Hughes’s portraiture (via), but then I figured I might as well have people look and make up their own minds.
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Feb 1, 2010

Here’s a recommendation Matt Wright-Steel of Eleanor Magazine sent me: Blake Gordon’s work, especially Reality TV, which is a commentary on the sheer amount of TV in people’s lives. Writes Gordon “Open your eyes. Step outside. Indulge in life.”
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Jan 28, 2010

In Invasive Species, Anna Collette uses plants as metaphors for the state of the world we live in (see her bio for some details on her work).
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Jan 21, 2010

I found Shigeru Takato’s work over at Mrs Deane. What really struck me were not the TV studios (which I had seen in similar form somewhere else - I’m pretty sure I linked to it at some stage), but the Our Elusive Cosmos project - images of landscapes that have a connection with actual or imagines space exploration. You might be able to guess what the above landscape was used for (click on the image to see a slightly larger version).
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Jan 20, 2010

For those interested in a photographer portraying family, there is Chris Verene’s work. I especially like how The Galesburg Series combines portraiture with other types of photography.
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Jan 19, 2010

Hugo Fernandes’ photography has a bit of a cinematic feel to it.
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Jan 12, 2010

I don’t link to photographers from South America much simply because their work is so hard to find online (the same, of course, is true for photographers from Africa). I came across Pablo Cabado’s work on Mrs Deane - the project entitled 37°57’35.35”S 57°34’49.34”W shows a derelict amusement park in Argentina.
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Jan 7, 2010

At the end of “collage week”, Aislinn Leggett’s Lost Faces seems like a good way to get back to “real” photography, or maybe more accurately in this case to contemporary (digital) photomontage (which, I realized, would be another very good topic for a week).
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Dec 31, 2009

Recreating historical images using models is nothing new, but in the case of Bradley Wollman’s The Little War, images of the Iraq war, there is an added dimension: Most of the original images, recreated by the artist, were either carefully staged - or at least controlled - themselves (such as the infamous tearing down of Saddam Hussein’s statue - here is CNN’s original report, and this is what the crowd really looked like, see this story), or they were leaked. Wollman’s images can thus be seen as questioning what the original images are really telling us in the first place.
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Dec 30, 2009

Detroit photographer James D. Griffioen’s The Disappearing City is a series of projects depicting just that: Wilderness where there used to be a city.
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Dec 21, 2009

As Sarina Finkelstein’s Prospectors shows, there’s a new gold rush in California (or maybe the old one never really ended).
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Dec 17, 2009

When I first saw Oswaldo Ruiz’s illuminated houses at The Black Snapper, I was reminded of how Myoung Ho Lee isolated trees from their environments, the differences being, of course, the objects and the ways they are made to appear against the background. Ruiz’s approach adds more visual drama, even though, at the end, I’m not sure it succeeds to move beyond the gimmicky (which is my main objection about Lee’s work, too).
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Dec 16, 2009

Barry Underwood’s photographs of altered landscapes remind me of Tokihiro Sato’s. I like this way of changing a landscape - or maybe of creating an installation that is really only made to exist inside the camera.
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Dec 15, 2009

Josh Quigley still doesn’t seem to have his own website to feature his carefully staged images - which is too bad, since I know there are a lot more images than these 16 here.
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Dec 14, 2009

Marino Balbuena is an Argentinian artist who studied architecture before becoming a photographer. Not all his work is centered on architecture, though (thanks, Thomas!)
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Dec 9, 2009

Mike Sinclair’s personal work contains some nice shots, such as this one from Fairgrounds (a nice picture for the season, isn’t it?).
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Dec 8, 2009

Herman Nicholson’s Stand guard over the solitude of the other is a study of portraiture via the use of just one subject. There are quite a few very nice portraits in the project, even though the large edit dilutes their power a bit.
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Dec 3, 2009

Today, I came across Rodrigo Abd’s photo essay about undertakers in Guatemala. A lot of great images, but not for the squeamish.
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Dec 1, 2009

You might know Blake Andrews from his blog (B), but he’s also a photographer.
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Nov 25, 2009

It’s the day before Thanksgiving, which is a good opportunity to reflect a bit on American and how (and as what) its people see it. Enters Bryan Schutmaat’s Western Frieze: “these photos are not meant to be pure documentation of America and its identity, but rather a portrait of what American identity means to me, and by photographing the West - where enigma, nostalgia, and history can be found in everyday scenes - I hope to help viewers find out what it means to them, whether or not they ever visit these sleepy towns and loneliest of landscapes for themselves.” (found here)
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Nov 24, 2009

There is a ton of very good photography on Laura Swanson’s site. About Anti-Self-Portraits, she writes “Part biography, these images represent my discomfort with being looked at and wishing I could hide. […] By removing identity and having the shape of my body stand in for the idea of difference, there is more room for thoughts about how one looks at another. The exchange is not just about me and the viewer anymore - it has the opportunity to open up into a broader conversation about how difference is looked at.” (thanks, Jonathan!)
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Nov 24, 2009

Alex Fradkin’s Bunkers (under Projects) in the San Francisco Bay area. As Fradkin notes “in most cases the bunkers were obsolete before they were finished being constructed.”
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Nov 23, 2009

Patrick Madigan’s The Monumental doesn’t need much of an explanation. Those who don’t like this kind of photography should check out the other projects, as they’re very different.
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Nov 18, 2009

“The subjects of these photographs are wives, mothers, siblings, cousins and friends of soldiers. They stand in as witnesses for the traces, the dust, the ash, the scent of what’s been lost and what’s been endured and what is still happening. Making images of the family members of soldiers that have served in Iraq or Afghanistan is a way to have a dialogue with a surreal experience. Ideally, the photograph can serve as a vehicle to illuminate the myriad and shared stories of loss, separation and hope.” - Teri Fullerton (statement found here)
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Nov 18, 2009

There’s a lot of good work in Matt Eich’s portfolio. Highlights: “Carry Me Ohio” and “Love In The First Person”.
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Nov 17, 2009

In a photography world obsessed with age I have been trying to avoid looking at age. That said, when I first saw Kyle Ferino’s I was very impressed: He is 23 years old, something you would never guess from the depth and quality of his work. As is often - but not always - the case, my choice of image is not necessarily representative of all of his work - make sure to look through all the various projects (oh, and this is how a website can be done in a functional and elegant way, with elegant statements that avoid all pretension and art speak).
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Nov 12, 2009

Michael Fuchs’ project about Lake Ontario would be a wonderful book - I hope there’ll be a publisher willing to make it.
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