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Contemporary Photographers

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Feb 11, 2004

Larry Fink just managed to upset conservative students at Lehigh University. A photo that is part of a satirical exhibit shows “man who could be President Bush’s identical twin [who] smirks for the camera, his left hand touching a woman in a negligee.” (story on ABC News) See the whole set, “loosly configurated [photos of] Dix, Groz, [and] Beckmann drawings and paintings”, here. Update (12 Feb): PDN Online reports “The work was originally scheduled to run in The New York Times Magazine the Sunday after 9/11, but the terrorist attacks and shifting mood of the country made Fink’s pictures too hot to handle, even in Europe.” (That can be true, I don’t know who Mr Fink talked to. I doubt he’ll find anybody in Europe who will disagree with his assessment of Mr Bush as “a twice entitled frat boy with charisma informed by homily and stubborn gotcha comfort.”) You can find some of the images and Fink’s quite interesting statement (that will make conservatives foam at the mouth) here.
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Feb 10, 2004

Have a look at Michael O’Brien’s The Face of Texas.
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Feb 10, 2004

For a long time, I couldn’t decide which sample to pick from Bobby Neel Adams’s work. In the end, I decided to go for one of his photos that’s unlike the stuff you’ve seen here before. Make sure you look at all his projects, they’re all very nice.
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Feb 9, 2004

Many of Chip Forelli’s photos have a somewhat surreal aura; I think his work must be the best long-exposure photography I’ve seen in a while.
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Feb 4, 2004

Over the past few months I tried to remember the name of the photographer who took the photos of those award-winning show chickens (just to make that abundantly clear - obviously a necessity in these retarded times - that show chickens and not show chicks). I tried lots of searches on Google but all used to get back were links to sites of people who breed chickens and proudly display their most beautiful specimen. Finally, today, I found what I was looking for. I can imagine that Tamara Staples does not want to be known as the photographer who did those chicken photos - she’s doing a lot of other cool stuff - but, you know, those chicken photos are quite cool. Here is an article about the chicken photos.
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Feb 4, 2004

Some of David Stark Wilson’s photography reminded me of the work seminal work done by Bernd and Hilla Becher.
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Feb 3, 2004

Several people told me about Todd Hido and it’s finally time to link to his website.
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Jan 31, 2004

How do you sell what is called “fashion” to people who have everything and, worse still, have seen everything? Terry Richardson’s solution is fairly simple - as you can probably guess from the image above. If you’re squeamish about naked bodies you probably don’t want to go and look at the images and interview.
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Jan 30, 2004

I almost did not link to this interview/presentation of Ruven Afanador because I’m not at all impressed by the Torero photo series. But then I saw the other photos, mainly fashion shots.
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Jan 29, 2004

Enjoy Jason Fulford’s website. Just keep clicking…
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Jan 28, 2004

Toni Hafkenscheid’s work is a curious mix of model landscapes and somewhat odd portraits. Very neat!
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Jan 27, 2004

I like Bharat Sikka’s work.
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Jan 26, 2004

I find Cindy Sherman’s photography utterly fascinating. There’s an old Salon.com article here and a fascinating interview here, the latter from Tate’s magazine.
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Jan 26, 2004

The photos of Robert and Shana Parkeharrison remind me of songs by Tom Waits.
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Jan 25, 2004

Mark Tucker recommended Mike and Doug Starn’s work. Very cool. I admit I find the interface a tad puzzling, though. Thanks, Mark!
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Jan 23, 2004

Susan Dobson’s work is almost a sociological project. I like her Home Invasion, about those Mao-uniform-style town houses that are so popular in North America.
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Jan 18, 2004

Mark Tucker wrote me an email and pointed out his new work Miami Road Trip. Not to be missed!
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Jan 16, 2004

Joel Sternfeld is one the most prolific and influential American photographers of his generation.
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Jan 14, 2004

It doesn’t really seem to say anywhere on his website but Scott Irvine’s photos look like they’ve been taken with a toy camera. The ones from the Mütter Museum in Philadelphia look quite creepy.
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Jan 12, 2004

Ray Carofano’s photography is quite beautiful. Unfortunately, there seem to be some technical problems with his website - some of the photos show fairly large compression artifacts.
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Jan 11, 2004

“This portfolio of images documents vernacular churches in the inner city neighborhoods of Houston and Los Angeles. The multiplicity of churches, temples, and congregations has produced a religious architecture very close to popular art, a sort of religious ‘Folk-Art’”. - Claudette Goux
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Jan 9, 2004

David Lachapelle is one of the big names in contemporary commercial photography. I’m sure people will disagree with me but I think that his stuff is mostly Pierre et Gilles minus the sheer gaudiness and fun.
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Jan 6, 2004

Due to the wide variety of his work, picking a sample of James Welling’s work is tough.
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Jan 6, 2004

You will need to spend a little bit more time looking at Bill Peronneau’s photography as it’s quite diverse. The above photo is from ‘The Cabin Series’: “As a photojournalist documenting the Civil Rights movement in Philadelphia, Bill Peronneau became a good friend of the town’s most famous resident: Muhammad Ali. After much pleading, Ali granted Peronneau rare access to his private cabin retreat in the nearby Pocono Mountains, where he would hole up to ‘center himself’ while in training - hence the contemplative nature of this series. The year was 1974, and Ali was preparing for the ‘Rumble in the Jungle’ in Zaire with George Foreman.”
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Dec 19, 2003

Richard Ballarian “prints use techniques he has developed since 1995. The colors and the print’s painted look in these silver gelatin (black and white) papers is a result of normal darkroom printing: exposure (multiple), developer bath, fixing, wash, toning and rewashing. Some toner baths and delays (oxygenation) have given these prints coloration.”
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Dec 14, 2003

Richie Fahey’s photos look like pulp-fiction illustrations - yet they’re hand-coloured photos. Thus, it made a lot of sense for a publishing company to pick Richie to do the covers of a series of James Bond novels.
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Dec 12, 2003

I’ve admired Gregory Crewdson’s work since I first saw it. Many of his photos are quite elaborately staged. Find more of his work at Luhring Augustine.
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Dec 9, 2003

Brent Stirton has done some very amazing photojournalistic projects, many in the poorest parts of the world. I was somewhat surprised to see that he also does “fashion” (almost naked anorexic girls), “sport”, and “corporate” (men in suits - yuck!) photography - maybe that’s what you have to do to make a living.
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Dec 8, 2003

I like Peter Haakon Thompson’s work.
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Nov 30, 2003

Oliver Wasow’s lo-fi webpage contains lots of excellent photos.
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Nov 28, 2003

I cannot imagine putting a lot of text, lots of explanations or motivations next to my photos. But that’s all a matter of personal style I suppose. David Plowden seems to feel a need for all those words.
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Nov 20, 2003

“Photojournalist Douglass Oster ditched the Nikons to spend a summer documenting small-town life with a vintage 1950s Kodak Brownie Hawkeye in his mother’s home town of Lisbon, Ohio.” (thru consumptive.org)
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Nov 16, 2003

If you try to find links for Robert Polidori you’re being bombarded with search results of book sellers who try to sell either Havana or Chernobyl. Recently, New Yorker magazine published some his work in extended slide shows, one about Dubai, the other one about ruined New Orleans.
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Nov 10, 2003

Photographs of human settlements or building with no human beings in them often evoke strange feelings. In the worst case, they just don’t look real. In the best case, they move something within us. David Heald’s “Architecture of Silence” belongs to the latter.
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Oct 31, 2003

I like Javier Tles’ style, especially his personal work.
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Oct 29, 2003

Am I the only one thinking that Spencer Tunick’s work is nothing more than the photographic equivalent of the Piss Christ?
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Oct 27, 2003

Bruce Charlesworth’s staged photography is - depending on your disposition - either quite amusing or unsettling.
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Oct 23, 2003

Robert Vizzini specializes in night-time photography.
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Oct 20, 2003

Masumi Hayashi’s website currently “focuses on a body of work that deals with the internment of Americans of Japanese ancestry during World War II. Hayashi’s panoramic photo collages show the remnants of sites of Japanese American Internment camps during World War II, an archeological memory.”
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Oct 16, 2003

Doctor Foxglove’s Polaroid Triptych Project (thru 12.s)
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Oct 1, 2003

The German in me likes Derek Shapton’s photos best when there are no people in them. His personal projects are absolutely gorgeous.
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Oct 1, 2003

“Already in the Middle Ages the village mosques in Mali and adjoining regions were being built of mud.” Sebastian Schutyser went to take photos of them.
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Sep 29, 2003

“Pesca Milagrosa, is the name given by Colombian guerillas to their suddenly erected blockades on motorways. There they choose which of the people stopped will be kidnapped. Taking this inhumane roulette game as a point of departure, the appropriated and digitally manipulated photographs in this work, question the media representation of the disappeared, missing or kidnapped persons from both South and North America.” - Carlos Motta
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Sep 16, 2003

Sometimes, I have to censor my choice of sample photo a little bit because open nudity is not being viewed in equal ways in different parts of the world. In the case of Nelson Garrido, nudity really was just a minor problem - and I’m not saying that because there is none to be found. On the contrary. Garrido created a series of photos in which “he juxtaposes his own Venezuelan, Roman Catholic identity with the American consumer society. In this way Garrido creates a new iconographic language around themes such as violence, religion, sex and trends, through which he poses questions about the socially enforced concepts, feelings and religious experience in Venezuela.” If you’re offended by either nudity or by religion put into a modern context do not look at his photos.
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Sep 15, 2003

Senegalese photographer Ousmane Ndiaye Dago “takes the woman as the subject for his photographs. He paints women with coloured earth, mud, carbon powder or orchil. Through this, the women’s skin appears to become stone, and she takes on the appearance of a sculpture. The nude is still a taboo in Senegal. In order not to be recognized, the women in the photographs avert their faces.”
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Sep 14, 2003

Aziz and Cucher produce digitally manipulated photography and other art.
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Sep 7, 2003

Without Grass - Images From the Urban Landscape directly appealed to me. Urban textures - in colour and b/w. (thru Dominic Ciancibelli)
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Aug 29, 2003

These days, I am very much stressed out about various work-related things so I thought I should look into simple, beautiful photography to calm the senses. Like Debra Bloomfield’s.
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Aug 27, 2003

Alex MacLean is well-known for his aerial photography. His own website features tons of photos (almost too many to browse through them) so if you just want a brief glimpse of some highlights check out this page.
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Aug 27, 2003

Anderson & Low “are perhaps best known for their groundbreaking work with the National Danish Gymnastic Team” - which to my German eye uses a certain amount of the kind of fascist aesthtics popularized by Leni Riefenstahl. But it would be somewhat nonsensical to overemphasize this. Even though fascism rested a lot of its power on the display of strong men and women (and of arms) we don’t have to look too far to see these very same mechanisms displayed in democratic nations - especially the ones which want to go to war. As far as this aspect of human life is concerned the Roman “tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis” is simply wrong.
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