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Contemporary Photographers

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Mar 7, 2005

Camille Solyagua’s photography possess a soothing tranquility not commonly found in photography.
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Mar 4, 2005

I’m impressed by Bob O’Connor’s photography. It also brings back pleasant memories of living in Boston.
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Mar 3, 2005

If you take any class on basic photography, they’ll tell you not to do what Scott Peterman does. Which only shows what photo rules are good for - if you know what you’re doing.
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Mar 2, 2005

Kevin Cooley’s portfolio contains some very nice nocturnal photography. I’m definitely looking forward to seeing more of his work in the future.
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Feb 24, 2005

Marla Sweeney’s “Chance Encounters” are exactly that.
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Feb 22, 2005

William Greiner belongs to the William Eggleston school.
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Feb 19, 2005

I hate talking about photography as if it was basically just another one of those art forms where people are always looking for new trends, and stuff that’s a little bit older is supposed to be “out”. Having said that, I am somewhat tired of the Nangoldinelinorcaruccietc school of photography with its copious amounts of self portraits and photos of the most relevant others. Maybe this is because I was never that excited about that kind of stuff in the first place. Helena Kvarnström does a lot of that stuff, but she also shoots grim looking land- and cityscapes. I’m quite impressed by those.
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Feb 17, 2005

Christy Karpinski style is very lyrical.
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Feb 16, 2005

Check out Justin Schmitz’s “Mosh”!
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Feb 16, 2005

Jason Lazarus teaches “expressive photography” and “self portraiture”.
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Feb 15, 2005

Diana Kingsley’s photography possesses a very minimalist beauty.
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Feb 12, 2005

Youssef Nabil’s beautifully hand-coloured b/w photos evoke a different era. Excellent!
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Feb 8, 2005

Apart from being a photographer, Aaron Ruell is a director, writer, and actor. You probably have seen him as “Kip” in Napoleon Dynamite.
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Jan 21, 2005

Beth Yarnelle Edwards’ suburban dreams is one of those photo projects where an idea is being executed so perfectly that it leaves one speechless.
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Jan 20, 2005

“Shards of America is a personal view of America, a poetic statement full of irony and pathos. It is an extended sequence constructed from fragmentary messages that encapsulate what I, as a Canadian, see and feel about America. The messages I have found and collected are those left behind by an exuberant, somewhat troubled, rushing humanity as it makes its way through the streets of a tumultuous America at the turn of the century.” - Phil Bergerson. Also note the interview with him in MakingRoom Magazine.
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Jan 13, 2005

I’m usually not that interested in the photos of malnourished people in overpriced clothes (aka fashion photography) but Billy & Hells’ work is different and interesting enough to feature it here (find more samples on this website where you have to skip the intro etc.). (thanks, Lauren!)
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Jan 6, 2005

There is no lack of colour or humour in Olivier Laude’s portraits.
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Dec 21, 2004

Thomas Allen’s series “Uncovered” brings book to life. Beyond the initial visual tickle it is pretty gimmicky, though.
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Dec 20, 2004

Lynne Cohen’s style of photography belies claims that it’s only Germans who produce this style of “deadpan” work.
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Dec 15, 2004

The amazing thing about Richard Ross’ website is that when you click on one of the photos under “projects” you get dozens and dozens of photos to look at - many of which are simply utterly amazing. Make sure you check out “Architecture of Authority”, “Fovea”, and “Shelters”. The latter has just been published as Waiting for the End of the World.
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Dec 12, 2004

It’s hard to say what category Craig Kalpakjian’s photography falls into. I am very tempted to call it architectural photography even though many people might/will disagree.
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Dec 12, 2004

“Over the past ten years, I’ve worked on a series of photographs taken in state capitols titled: Statesmen - Pictures from the Fifty State Capitols, where I photographed and re-interpreted the portraits of former governors from each of the fifty states. With this project, I created a personal Hall of Governors, a collection of salesmen, matinee idols and fools, as well as respected ordinary men.” - Sybil Miller
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Dec 10, 2004

I haven’t linked to too many b/w photographers lately, which is - as everything else that’s going on around here - due to my own personal preferences. Today, I came across Debbie Fleming Caffery’s work, and I was quite amazed. I think in general I like b/w work, which makes use of a lot of white or a lot of black. There’s just no way to get more impact with b/w.
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Nov 29, 2004

File Magazine just added Stan Banos’ Pet Cemetery Project to their galleries. Check it out!
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Nov 18, 2004

Joshua Hoffine’s “Horror Photography” presents the whole set of American nightmares.
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Nov 18, 2004

Daido Moriyama is one of Japan’s most important contemporary photographers.
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Nov 17, 2004

Michaël David André’s photos are like a mix between Thomas Ruff’s digital remixed internet pornography and Francis Bacon’s nightmarish creatures. And all that using Polaroid SX-70 manipulations. Update(23 Nov 2004): Michaël David André emailed me and noted that “the distortion in my photos is not the result of the traditional sx-70 image manipulation technic but a technic I’ve developped using optical and magnifying lens in front of the camera during the shooting.” This makes it even more interesting.
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Nov 10, 2004

There is a nice selection of photos by Paul Baron at the George Eastman House. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find out more about Paul Baron.
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Nov 5, 2004

“For the past four years I have traveled throughout America and Eastern Europe photographing sites that represent important political and social events in contemporary world history. […] Acting as a kind of visual historian I seek to create images that convey a unique and important view of select aspects of World History. Within architecture and landscapes I find my true subject, the detritus of civilization, and seek to explore the way we define and relate to its existence.” - Brian McKee
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Nov 3, 2004

I really like Rich Miceli’s photography, especially the “Ocean Parkway” project (NB: The page seems to load quite slowly).
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Oct 21, 2004

Lewis Baltz’s architectural photography is quite amazing - even though, I bet, there are lots of people who’ll find it anything bu amazing. Find more info on Lewis Baltz here.
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Oct 20, 2004

Keith Cottingham takes photos that look like architectural photos or like portraits but are, in fact, photos of models and dummies.
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Oct 18, 2004

Doug Hall could be one of the usual suspects (Bechergurskyhoferstruth).
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Oct 18, 2004

Colby Caldwell’s work is colourful and experimental.
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Oct 14, 2004

Andrea Robbins and Max Becher are a married couple that is quite prolific. Check out German Indians/Karl May Festival, Bavarian by law, or Figurines.
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Oct 13, 2004

Christopher Becker has done a lot of work with what people usually call “light painting”. Go and have a peek.
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Oct 12, 2004

Richard Renaldi has a fairly large set of interesting portfolios. His series about gay and lesbian elderly is very nice - especially since he is living in a country where right-wing populists and religious fundamentalists are waging an increasing (albeit losing) campaign against homosexuality -, as is the highway series.
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Oct 11, 2004

Seze Devres’ photograms are probably the best of their kind I’ve ever seen.
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Oct 10, 2004

Lynn Davis’ portfolio contains very interesting photography of which I like the architecturial and technical shots the best.
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Sep 29, 2004

William Lamson’s work follows the tradition of William Eggleston. Here you can find a short interview with him.
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Sep 23, 2004

Timothy Greenfield-Sanders is one of the most important American portrait photographers. There’s just no way around seeing one of his photos someplace. This page has a conversation between Lou Reed (formerly a rock star, now almost just a poseur), Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, and Kim Zorn Caputo. And then there’s the website for his new book/film The XXX Project that features portraits of porn stars and essays by various major and minor celebrities. Sex clearly sells.
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Sep 23, 2004

I find Gaylen Morgan’s Floating Worlds most appealing - maybe because I grew up by the sea.
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Sep 3, 2004

Timothy Archibald’s portfolio contains a series of very nice sets of work. I like the Sunday Afternoon Bingo. And for those people interested in what the Monty Pythons used to call “the naughty bits” there is the photojournalistic The Sex Machines project - photos of and interviews with people who work on building machines to have sex with.
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Aug 31, 2004

In their latest series, Davis and Davis use found dolls and other little toys to talk about serious things (see, for example, this statement). I find that a bit strained, but the photos are great anyway. (seen at spitting image)
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Aug 30, 2004

Joel Meyerowitz is one of the most important contemporary US photographers, and his own website could almost serve as a prime example of what you’d like to see. There are a few more interesting sites to look at: Check out Legends Online; and also don’t miss Images from Ground Zero, where Joel Meyerwitz was allowed to take photos. In that context, it’s interesting to read this interview with Joel Meyerowitz about his Ground Zero photography.
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Aug 30, 2004

Robyn Cumming’s photography reminds me of Jan Saudek’s, except that it is much tamer.
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Aug 28, 2004

Joni Sternbach emailed me to tell me about her own website.
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Aug 19, 2004

Tonight, I watched the movie The True Meaning of Pictures: Shelby Lee Adams’ Appalachia, which, as the title indicates, is about Shelby Lee Adams’ photos of people living in Appalachia. With a subject matter like the one Shelby Lee Adams is showing it’s probably not surprising that critics have accused him of exploiting the people he is portraying. Is he? It’s interesting to watch the movie - find a very nice article about the problem here - simply because it confronts you, as the viewer, with your own preconceptions: Why is it bad to show mentally retarded people living in Appalachia? Because it is stereotypical per se or because it re-inforces your own stereotypes?
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Aug 17, 2004

Gail Thacker uses Polaroid 665 positive/negative black-and-white film for her very creative photos.
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Aug 16, 2004

Stephen Wilkes is another commercial photographer with a very nice portfolio. His Bethlehem Steel and Ellis Island projects are particularly noteworthy.
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