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Contemporary Photographers

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May 8, 2013

This is an image from Paolo Woods’ Chinafrica, a photographic portrait of the roughly half a million Chinese people working in Africa.
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May 6, 2013

According to the artist, Diane Meyer’s Time Spent That Might Otherwise Be Forgotten “is based on photographs taken at various points in my life and arranged by location. Sections of the images have been obscured through a layer of embroidered pixels sewn directly into the photograph. The embroidery deteriorates sections of the original photograph forming a new pixelated layer of the original scene. The project refers to the failures of photography in preserving experience and personal history as well as the means by which photographs become nostalgic objects that obscure objective understandings of the past.”
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Apr 30, 2013

Curran Hatleberg appears to have an instinct to make the right picture, at the right time, often in places where you wouldn’t expect to find one. See my piece on another one of his photographs.
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Apr 29, 2013

Mustafah Abdulaziz’s Memory Loss is filled with images that are almost too good to be true, a laconic portrait of the US and the people living there.
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Apr 23, 2013

In Apres Strand, Bertrand Carriere follows the trails of Paul Strand who in 1929 and 1936 visited the Gaspé Peninsula, which resulted in Strand understanding what he called “the essential character of a place.” (more information [in English] here)
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Mar 26, 2013

This is a photograph from Callum Ross’ moody and slightly mysterious West.
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Mar 19, 2013

Jess T. Dugan writes about Every breath we drew: “By asking others to be vulnerable and intimate with me through the act of being photographed, I am laying claim to my own desires and defining what I find beautiful and powerful while asking larger questions about how identity is formed, desire is expressed, and intimate connection is sought.”
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Mar 18, 2013

“This work in progress is the story of a community struggling to understand its place in a changing world while trying to hang on to a fading American dream.” - Brendan Hoffman about his Stand the Middle Ground
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Mar 12, 2013

Everglades by Lisa Elmaleh is a bit of a mixed bag, but the good photographs are really very good.
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Mar 6, 2013

“In this piece, I investigate several realms of existence of fifty-five very large rocks, which I’ve labeled as cairns, found in yards around Cedar City, Utah.” - Jeremias Paul about his Constellation
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Feb 27, 2013

This portrait is part of Helen Luo’s project Rochester, an inquiry into a city as afflicted by economic changes as many others in the US.
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Feb 20, 2013

“The Armory documents the ever-changing sets of the BDSM pornography company Kink.com. These custom-built backdrops, from suburban homes to meat lockers, appear both familiar and strangely foreign. Private spaces constructed daily for the public gaze indicate the demand, consumption, and manufacture of sexual fantasy.” - Elizabeth Moran
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Feb 19, 2013

Tom Griggs is the mastermind behind Fototazo, and he’s also a photographer. The image above is from his body of work Wound and Fountain, exploring, in Griggs’ words, “the evolution of my relationship with my wife, Ana.”
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Feb 13, 2013

Gail Pine & Jacqueline Woods are collecting vernacular photographs, to create what they call American Typologies out of them: Bernd and Hilla Becher meet Erik Kessels. Make sure to spend some time on the site, there are quite a few discoveries to be made.
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Feb 12, 2013

“Through small deliberate interventions, I altered these vintage images, allowing light to pass through them. (After all, photographs are made possible with light.)” - Amy Friend about Dare alla Luce
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Feb 5, 2013

“There are currently 200,000 migrant domestic workers in Lebanon todayin a country of 4 million. Due to the sponsorhsip system, maids are required to live with their employers, and are instantly ‘illegal’ when they run away from the home. Maids save on rent, bills, and food costs living with their employers. These women often hold households together, they are the mothers, the cooks, the doctors, and the cleaners. According to Human Rights Watch report in 2008, one maid is dying every week as a result of abuse or suicide.” - Natalie Naccache in the introduction to No, Madam
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Jan 30, 2013

This image is from Isidora Gajic’s Dutch Love Diary, photographed over the five years the artist spent in Holland.
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Jan 29, 2013

I found this pair of images in David Zilber’s Empiricism. The photographs in Zilber’s portfolios are well seen; however when paired they become quite a bit more interesting for me (Of course, this might be just me being currently quite tired of the barrage of single pictures that have made Tumblr such a drag).
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Jan 22, 2013

This is a photograph from Pete Pin’s Cambodian Diaspora.
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Jan 21, 2013

“Critics claim that the boom in U.S. prison population has gone unnoticed because the war on drugs has been fought primarily in African Americans communities. From this view, mass incarceration in America is just another system of racial oppression, which has roots in slavery and Jim Crow legislation. Since the start of the war on drugs more than 31 million people have been arrested for drug-related crimes. With this report, I have documented the cycle of incarceration that U.S. Drug War policies have created in the communities that inmates leave behind.” - Raymond Thompson jr. about his project Justice Undone: A Dream Denied
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Jan 15, 2013

“In 1993, I relocated from my native homeland of Scotland to the United States, where I have spent almost half my life.” writes Sandy Carson, introducing his project I’m New Here.
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Jan 9, 2013

With We met a little early, but I get to love you longer Raphaela Rosella tackles the issue of teenage pregnancy: “With teenage pregnancy normal in my hometown, each story is close or personal to me in some way. ‘We met a little early, but I get to love you longer’ is a collaboration with young mothers from Indigenous and/or disadvantaged backgrounds from my neighbourhood or local area. By investigating and individualising the complex range of issues that lead teen girls to early pregnancy and the challenges they face, the collaborations seek to show that each mother is different, and there is no ‘uniform’ type.”
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Jan 8, 2013

Karen Miranda Rivadeneira’s Other Stories I/II is autobiographical in nature, showing re-enacted scenes from the photographer’s past.
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Dec 19, 2012

Goseong Choi’s Meji transforms barren wastelands into oddly compelling semi-abstract imagery.
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Dec 18, 2012

Gaia Danieli’s Thoughts unsaid, then forgotten looks at the domestic lives of couples, and at how much we might really know of another person.
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Dec 12, 2012

Lisa Fairstein’s Ultra-Static plays with the conventions and language of photography, mixing ideas from commercial and conceptual contexts.
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Dec 11, 2012

Hye-Ryoung Min is one of the winners of this year’s Conscientious Portfolio Competition, having submitted Channel 247, a body of work that combines elements of curiosity, voyeurism, and surveillance.
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Dec 10, 2012

This is an image from Sudden rain in the street by Bangladeshi photographer K. M. Asad.
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Nov 26, 2012

Nancy Newberry’s Mums focuses on homecoming mums, apparently a Texas tradition.
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Nov 20, 2012

Studio photography from Burkina Faso: Ibrahim Sanlé Sory (scroll down to see the images; the ones on the top - which aren’t any worse - are by Norom Japhet)
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Nov 19, 2012

In Despite Or Because Of by Charlie Simokaitis we are thrown into an unsettling world of mostly darkness where even seemingly brighter spots appear to carry tremendous weight.
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Nov 14, 2012

With Remember Me When I Am Gone Away Sarah Mitrani visually processes the death of her younger sister Julie.
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Nov 6, 2012

Zachary S. Allen’s In the Field explicitly includes taking photographs as part of the experience of landscape. We might as well ask: In today’s world, if something isn’t photographed does it exist?
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Nov 5, 2012

In Background Noise Ben Alper introduces digital distortions in the world of analog photographs.
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Oct 24, 2012

This is an image from Katrin Koenning’s multi-volume Near, an ongoing portrait of the photographer’s family.
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Oct 9, 2012

“Holding Still is a collection of found travel photographs from a woman’s estate. Nothing is known about her other than that she was a resident of Vancouver, Canada. After feeling a strong affinity to her aesthetic and photographic sensibilities, I decided to scan and archive her images to share.” - Jennilee Marigomen
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Oct 3, 2012

“There was no man that my father admired more than his father, and no one his father admired more than the man who raised him.” writes McNair Evans in the introduction of A Journal of Southern History, a wonderful project that avoids all the usual cliches and dives deep into the family’s history. “With tenderness of heart, warm humor, and deep love, my father met everyone as his equal. Working at factories and farms my family owned shaped my perception of the world in familial stability. […] Upon his death in November 2000, I was exposed to my father’s insolvency and looming debts. A series of devastating fires, bad crops, perpetual over-extension and high-interest loans were his legacy. Five generations of familial and financial stability fractured beneath me.”
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Sep 26, 2012

Augustin Rebetez’s website skillfully mixes photographs, video, and animated gifs (the above image is merely a static view of part of it) - and if you don’t like what you see then, well, you can move stuff around.
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Sep 25, 2012

Bryan Graf is a member of the yet-to-be-named new movement in photography that treats the medium to a large extent as self-referential. For me, this is both great (btw it really helps push this sort of photography in an art world that for the most part only gets photography if it very obviously looks like art and if the artists juggle the necessary jargon) and a bit of a problem at the same time: What does this ultimately tell me? I’m sure I’ll find out eventually. (updated from 2009 post)
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Sep 5, 2012

I still don’t know what the type of photography on display at Alex Kisilevich’s website is called. There is quite a few of this type of work around these days - photography centered on photography, I suppose, with sculptural and/or conceptual elements thrown in.
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Aug 29, 2012

Margaret Durow’s Weightless is aptly named: The often surprising images showcase the idea of youth, without catering to the usual cliches. This work feels young and fresh, but not calculated.
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Aug 21, 2012

Samuel Finlak is a portrait photographer from Cameroon. It seems the only place where you can see his photographs online is this Flickr page.
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Aug 20, 2012

“I am an African-European, born in Switzerland and my project was accomplished on a trip to Guinea Conakry. In this work, I was interested in the construction and deconstruction of the body as well as the depiction of the invisible. I have studied ritual artifacts common to the cosmology of Guineans; statuettes that are part of a ceremonial structure. They are from another world, they are the roots of the living. Thereby, I sought to touch the untouchable. […] In recontextualizing these sacred objects through the lens, I brought them in a framework meant for Western aesthetic choices and taste.” - Namsa Leuba in the introduction of Ya Kala Ben
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Aug 15, 2012

This is a photograph from Andrew Fillmore’s Politics, looking behind the scenes of that business.
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Aug 6, 2012

Olivia Locher is a young and extremely prolific photographers, whose work defies simple categories. There’s a lot of work on her site, start by clicking on “archives” (at the top) and then work your way through (using the links at the bottom of the page).
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Jul 25, 2012

“This body of work is about my family in the wake of my parent’s divorce. Through making these photographs I show the change in our family dynamics and domestic life. I explore universal themes of loss, change, and intimate and familial relationships.” - Alex Nelson about From Here on Out
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Jul 4, 2012

Interspace by Kelly Kristin Jones is filled with very nice portraits. (via LPV Magazine)
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Jul 2, 2012

This is a image from Nathan Cyprys’ Ayre (of Distances). The project contains some multimedia - really just photography done with different means (or maybe expanding the idea what a photograph can be).
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Jun 27, 2012

The term “comfort women” is one of those ugly euphemisms used to hide the nasty reality behind it: During World War 2, Japan employed “very large numbers of forced labourers to work in its wartime mines and factories. In the Japanese case, a particularly dark aspect of this coercion was the forcible recruitment of women who were held in so-called ‘comfort stations’ and subjected to rape and other forms of sexual abuse at the hands of the Japanese military.” (source) So we’re talking about forced prostitution, sexual slavery here. This topic has remained hugely contentious, in particular since the Japanese government has been more than hesitant to deal with this part of the country’s past (this phrases it rather mildly). Photographer Ahn Sehong has portrayed some of these women who are still alive in Layer by Layer. Earlier this year, Nikon, the Japanese camera maker, announced it was going to cancel an exhibition of the work in Tokyo. This created a stir in the photo community; you might have seen, for example, Duckrabbit’s post. The Tokyo District Court has now ordered Nikon to open the exhibition (source), and you can find a report by someone who went to see it at the inimitable Microcord blog.
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Jun 18, 2012

This photograph is part of Anne Lamb’s Nudes. They’re nudes alright, and they’re a bit different. There are three parts, I like numbers 2 and 3 quite a bit.
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