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Contemporary European Photography

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Oct 18, 2010

Ivor Prickett’s work exists in this strange zone where you don’t know whether you’re dealing with photojournalism, documentary photography, or fine-art photography. This probably points to the fact that what we should be talking about is not how to label something, but, instead, the stories that are being told. (thanks to duckrabbit’s Ben for the tip!)
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Oct 14, 2010

There is very little appealing about the buildings (built in Zanzibar in the 1960s by a group of East German architects who wanted to demonstrate an ideal socialist neighborhood) depicted in Mieke Woestenburg’s Ex Territory. The presentation of the photographs, however, lifts these buildings from their visual squalor and creates an interesting presentation. (via)
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Oct 6, 2010

Martin Usborne’s Mute portrays dogs left to wait in cars at night - in the photographer’s words, it’s about the “fear of being alone and unheard.”
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Oct 4, 2010

Helen Flanagan’s No Strings Attached “aims to document an online world that revolves around sex. It looks deeper at current issues such as technology, modern human relations and sexuality by talking and photographing willing people whom use adult dating and swinging Internet websites.”
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Sep 29, 2010

“In the Rainbow series, I digitally overlaid rainbows on photographs to include a new visual and possibly conceptual dimension.” - Andrey Bogush
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Sep 28, 2010

Fabio Barile’s Among studies the effects of erosion due to overdevelopment along the Italian coastline.
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Sep 13, 2010

Frank Robert’s Endstation Sehnsucht [final stop longing] depicts Vienna’s Prater amusement park.
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Aug 24, 2010

“Once a deserted land and traditionally an impoverished territory, today the Almeria, Dalías and Níjar fields represent the largest concentration of plastic greenhouses in the world. This photo essay documents how the mass-production of vegetables for northern European markets has dramatically shaped the landscape of the region. Southeast Spain is still one of the main arrival points of migrants from Africa into the European Union and more than 20,000 undocumented workers are systematically employed in this labour-intensive industry. Many have to endure extreme living and working conditions; most have set sail across a murderous sea only to become trapped in the red tape of immigration rules in this imposing maze of white plastic.” - Reinaldo Loureiro, in his introduction of Hothouse.
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Aug 18, 2010

“Seseña nuevo is a deserted mini-city built some 40km from Madrid, in the middle of nowhere. Also known as “Francisco Hernando residential”, named after its constructor, this phantasmagorical site hosts 13508 flats. Built without any kind of urban planning and previous infrastructures, such as water supply and public transportation, Seseña nuevo started rising from the ground in the year 2000, the same year when a construction boom took place in Spain.” - Pedro Guimaraes
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Aug 16, 2010

Mariam Amurvelashvili’s Dukhobors portrays a Christian sect in Georgia/Russia.
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Aug 12, 2010

The kind of photography that Bert Danckaert has been a bit neglected on this blog, so it’s time to spend a little time with it. So have a good look, and let the images sink in.
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Aug 5, 2010

I’ve been to Italy three times, but I’ve never seen the parts that look like those portrayed by Alessandro Imbriaco. Beautiful photography. (via)
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Aug 2, 2010

The tidal changes in Michael Marten’s Sea Change will be familiar to anyone who grew up or has lived by the sea (that has tides, that is). Needless to say, with global warming raising the water levels, this body of work also touches upon larger issues.
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Jul 15, 2010

It’s easiest to think of Reinier Gerritsen’s The Europeans as constructed street photography: The photos are assembled from a series of individual images, taken within a second or two in the same spot, with the photographer’s disguise being a bright orange construction worker outfit. The work is featured in Foam Magazine #23 (with an essay by yours truly).
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Jul 12, 2010

Rachel Cooke’s Memorials of Belfast adds another aspect to the slowly growing set of photography dealing with history in Northern Ireland.
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Jul 7, 2010

The rabid nationalism aside, what makes international sports events such as the Soccer World Cup so grating is the complete absence of any kind of humour. As an antidote of sorts, check out Olivier Cablat’s typological study of soccer player portraits, using Panini stickers (“Ever since 1970 when they were first produced, the countdown to the World Cup has really started with the arrival of the Panini stickers: 638 players, teams, stadiums and badges to be collected and stuck as neatly as possible - harder than it sounds - into the appropriate numbered slot in the album.” - story) Needless to say, Cablat’s website offers more than just the mock soccer typology, have a look at Egypt 3000.
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Jul 6, 2010

Xavier Delory’s Fermé le dimanche (Closed on Sundays) is a typology, which focuses on shops who are built to look like churches. This makes the artist ask whether our shopping centers are our new places of worship. Make sure not to miss his other work.
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Jul 1, 2010

Jens Olof Lasthein’s recollections of his travels in Eastern Europe are a great read.
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Jun 28, 2010

The photography on Lorenzo Durantini’s website is very diverse, so picking an example made was difficult. In the end, I decided to go with an example from Taking Things Apart, a type of work that might be a bit neglected on this blog.
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Jun 24, 2010

There are a lot of images in André Cepeda’s Ontem, but it’s well worth a good look.
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Jun 15, 2010

“Is there still a role for pirate radio stations in the podcast era?” asks Bertus Gerssen. Apparently, there is, even though I would have imagined them to look a bit more piratey.
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Jun 10, 2010

Guy Batey calls his The Melancholy of Objects a “a series of portraits of the objects […] found lost or discarded on the streets of Southwark in south-east London.” And they do indeed come across as portraits. (thanks, Kevin!)
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Jun 8, 2010

Isabelle Pateer’s Manufacturing Apathy portrays workers in a metal factory in Ukraine.
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Jun 7, 2010

Steven Barritt’s Anachronisms “aims to explore the historical and contemporary relationship between painting and photography.” Excellent.
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May 31, 2010

Maros Krivy describes his Entropy as him being “interested in the relationship between banality and complexity to be found in these places.”
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May 27, 2010

Mark Nozeman’s website is filled to the brim with photographic treasures, this one being from a project about gold diggers in Surinam.
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May 18, 2010

About his series Homeland Serkan Taycan writes “With the passage of time I have, of course, changed a lot. But my homeland of Anatolia, which I left behind, has also changed. During my recent travels in Anatolia, I have encountered many images, situations, and people that aroused both feelings of intimate familiarity and great distance in me. These contradictory feelings have forced me to dwell on the issue of ‘belonging’. From this, new questions about ‘Homeland’ have emerged.” (source)
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May 17, 2010

Broken down civilization at the edges of new settlements - Jose Guerrero’s Ephemerals.
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May 13, 2010

Salva Lopez’s website contains a beautiful project entitled Roig 26. (via)
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May 12, 2010

Sofie Knijff’s Translations portrays young children in Mali, India, and South Africa, dressed up as the profession they dream of having in the future.
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May 11, 2010

There’s a large variety of work in Mathieu Pernot’s portfolio, most of it well worth the look (oh, and it’s a good chance to practice your French, since there’s no English text).
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May 6, 2010

Matthieu Lavanchy’s Mr Schuhlmann - a commentary on our state of terror-related paranoia - combines installation and performance art with photography, with the images being the relevant component.
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May 5, 2010

James Reeve presented Lightscapes at the Hyeres Festival this year, the images of which unfortunately look much, much better as large prints than as smallish images on a computer screen. The above image is from Banned, a survey of all the activities that were banned under Taliban rule in Afghanistan.
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Apr 27, 2010

My friend Mark sent me the link to Francesco Giusti’s work, and I ended up spending most time looking through Djenne’.
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Apr 20, 2010

I don’t link to photography like Thomas Rousset’s as often as I should. This image is from Behind The Smiles, which the photographer describes as “A frozen era where only mountain dwellers and itinerants have survived, where children’s tales and rural fantasies can meet and become real” and “where tribalism and autarky have taken over, where theatricality and the burlesque define situations.” It’s a bit like Tom Waits producing a version of Mad Max. (via)
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Apr 15, 2010

Richard Davies’ photographic survey of Russian wooden churches is a follow-up of the work of Ivan Yakovlevich Bilibin, who had done a survey about one hundred years earlier: “Many churches have been saved by dedicated specialists and enthusiasts, whose untiring work goes on. We hope that the photographs in this exhibition will help raise public awareness of the plight of these wonderful buildings and that more restoration projects will attract the funding they deserve.”
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Apr 15, 2010

Ancient Egyptians used embalming techniques, with elaborate grave sites and pyramids being optional for the rich and powerful. Today, there is cryogenic freezing, steel tanks and wooden boxes so people can deposit flowers. We’re more advanced than ancient Egypt (or so we like to think), yet the underlying beliefs are the same. Murray Ballard’s The Project of Immortality portrays this modern industry.
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Apr 5, 2010

Peter Ainsworth’s Concrete Island is a project I would have never imagined I’d like (that the web doesn’t do the image quality much, if any, justice). The photos all show the walls of some concrete overpass, partially covered with graffiti, rendered beautifully with a large-format camera. Those less interested in semi-abstract photography might prefer Covered, which looks like conceptual art, a set of photographs showing plants made ready for the Winter.
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Mar 29, 2010

“Throughout the twenty years in which Africans have been trying to reach Europe by boat, at least 13,000 migrants have died and another 5,000 have gone missing at sea. I photographed the rooms where young Senegalese men had lived, before they risked their lives trying to reach the Canary Islands in small fishing boats. What do the rooms look like: what is left of personal belongings, what disappeared and what is taken over by family or friends?” - Judith Quax
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Mar 22, 2010

Rauf Mamedov’s restaging of mostly religious paintings, using Down Syndrome actors, is sure to ruffle some feathers. Find some more information here.
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Mar 11, 2010

Some of Johan Bergström’s work is quite conceptual, but there should be something for everybody on his site. The Spectators is work in progress, I am curious to see more.
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Mar 9, 2010

Gabriele Basilico is an Armory Show discovery for me. I found two of his images from Beirut, which, I think, is by far his very best work. See more images, plus some text, here.
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Mar 8, 2010

Those who can’t get enough of typologies will enjoy Eric Tabuchi’s website (via).
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Mar 1, 2010

I found the link to Pétur Thomsen’s Imported Landscape over at 1/125. I personally like Thomsen’s Umhverfing even better.
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Feb 23, 2010

I wish Francesco Millefiori’s portfolio was organized a little better, with some background text for the different bodies of work, but I like the photography regardless.
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Feb 22, 2010

With Island, Roderik Henderson seems to have transformed the inside of an elevator into a portrait studio. The results are spectacular.
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Feb 17, 2010

I can’t escape the feeling that our fascination with the ruins of Detroit mirrors that of Victorians who’d flock to Pompeii. We have a description for this: ruin porn. But there are still people living in Detroit, quite a few actually; and their story usually seems to get overlooked or ignored. It sure is easier to go to Detroit, take some photos of ruins and have those illustrate some story about the decline of America, isn’t it? So I was glad to find Daimon Xanthopoulos’ Detroit, stories from a city in free fall, which is filled with photographs of people (via, where there are more images). Also see this story.
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Feb 16, 2010

I found Andy O’Connell’s work over at The Black Snapper, but I was unable to dig up another site with images. That’s too bad, I’d really like to see more of his work.
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Feb 15, 2010

“With my camera in hand I go on urban explorations of man-made architecture that once served a purpose and held a promise of a brighter future, yet has been deserted and left to decompose. Now like outcasts the buildings sit unnoticed waiting to be discovered again. ” - Magda Biernat
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Feb 11, 2010

João Margalha’s Wonder examines the relationship between Nature and humans trying to leisurely spend time in it (often in areas heavily modified).
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