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Contemporary European Photography

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Aug 3, 2005

Cuny Janssen’s has evolved from her earlier focus on portraiture to other areas.
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Aug 1, 2005

Signs of the times: Christopher Stewart’s Insecurity, discussed here in more detail.
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Jul 27, 2005

I wouldn’t be able to tell with conviction, but I think Rineke Dijkstra’s portraits caused the first big wave about some sort of new portraiture. While I like the beach portraits very much, I think the rest is not even close to those. See more samples here and here; and compare with Hellen van Meene’s work who Rineke Dijkstra is often compared with.
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Jul 24, 2005

I don’t know what it is but Jacko Vassilev brings aspects to portrait photography that you don’t necessarily see everywhere else.
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Jul 19, 2005

If you look at photo critique forums you’ll find that overly Photoshopped photos are becoming more and more popular. If you have been to those forums you will probably familiar with Andrzej Dragan’s work. I don’t know what that tells us about what kind of taste people have, given that these images very often are the photographic equivalent of Hallmark figurines. I’m also not sure everybody has to look as if he or she came right out of a “Lord of the Rings” movie. Disclaimer for people who like to simply arguments for the sake of sending angry email: Don’t get me wrong, there really is nothing wrong with using Photoshop to fix up photos. But too much is too much.
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Jul 14, 2005

Nienke Klunder’s portraits and self-portraits are quite interesting, even though I’m really not sure some of those projects are as clever as she might want them to be.
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Jul 11, 2005

Imagine Henry Darger had not drawn weird images of little girls but, instead, had taken photos of women. And then imagine at the ripe old age of almost 80 years, he would have been able to get his photos into a gallery. With Philip-Lorca diCorcia being sued over photos of strangers probably whole legions of lawyers would rub their hands gleefully. Enters Miroslav Tichy who “with cameras that he himself skilfully and imaginatively cobbled together from old tins, spectacle lenses, toilet rolls and cigarette boxes, in the 1970s and 80s […] took over a hundred shots a day of women in his small hometown in Moravia.” There also is a nice story about him, albeit in German, here See many more photos here, a short article and two large photos here, some more samples here, plus two entries on Hot Gun Spy (1, 2).
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Jul 4, 2005

Kéa Nop’s site contains a photoblog; but where it really gets interesting is in the galleries.
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Jun 16, 2005

Julian Germain just had his book For every minute you are angry you lose sixty seconds of happiness published. It is about an elderly man he met: “Charlie was a simple, gentle, man. He loved flowers and the names of flowers. He loved colour and surrounded himself with colour. He loved his wife. Without ever trying or intending to, he showed me that the most important things in life cost nothing at all. He was my antidote to modern living.”
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Jun 3, 2005

Anita Andrzejewska’s b/w photography has a little bit of a vintage look, despite the modern compositions.
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May 17, 2005

Since 1994, French photographer Laurence Demaison has done nothing else but self-portraits. Hers are fairly interesting, though - in many cases, it’s almost impossible to still recognize the person.
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May 15, 2005

Paul Seawright’s photos are often quite spare and understated, even when he goes to Afghanistan, being on commission by the Imperial War Museum (don’t the British have an interesting honesty about their stuff?). See more photos here and here.
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May 14, 2005

Martina Mullaney’s work has a very contemporary look. An excellent example of how, for a photographer, less can be so much more!
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May 12, 2005

Steve Pyke is one of my favourite portrait photographers. I discovered his work when I stumbled upon his book Philosophers in a book shop in New York City. In January 2005, he joined New Yorker magazine as a staff photographer - a position created by the late Richard Avedon. England’s National Portrait Gallery owns an an impressive set of photos done by Steve Pyke. Also noteworthy is Zonezero’s show of Apollo astronauts. (updated re-post)
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May 9, 2005

Georges Rousse (also see this page) constructs elaborate optical illusions by selectively painting parts of buildings in such a way that, when viewed from a certain direction, a pattern emerges. (Isn’t this description a fine example of how a description can be very precise, yet not too helpful? Have a look at this image: Here, the white circle is formed by those parts of the building that the artist painted white - because you look at it from the direction where all the different white bits of the building form a circle). Update (10 May): This page documents how one of those rooms is prepared. Note how the tedious work is done by students!
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May 5, 2005

Andrea Botto photography contains a beautiful mix of architectural work, landscapes, and portraits.
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Apr 28, 2005

Marleen Sleeuwits’s compositional skills, combined with her tendency towards a certain minimalism, make her work extremely pleasing to look at.
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Apr 25, 2005

I discovered Jason Oddy’s photos in See Saw magazine; and despite my best efforts I found only two other links, both descriptions of past shows (1, 2).
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Apr 5, 2005

One of the side effects of compiling a weblog like this one is that I am fairly familiar with a lot of photography. When I first came across Aneta Grzeszykowska & Jan Smaga’s photography (in New Yorker magazine) I immediately remembered there was a German photographer doing almost the same kind of work (on the minus side, I couldn’t remember his name; on the plus side, those categories here work really well). Andreas Gefeller is the guy - compare his “Supervisions” with Aneta Grzeszykowska & Jan Smaga’s. More samples of their work can be found here and here.
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Mar 26, 2005

Joël Tettamanti’s website is old-school - his photos are not!
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Mar 26, 2005

Loan Nguyen is a young Swiss photographer whose personal work contains many gems.
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Mar 21, 2005

French photographer Eric Aupol takes photos that are very sparse and somewhat unsettling.
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Mar 15, 2005

When being emailed the link to Cyrille Weiner’s work I was a bit torn, but I’ve some to like it since.
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Mar 11, 2005

It’s interesting to see how many aspects of what people often think of as fine art photography can be found in some commercial photographers’ work (and vice versa). For example, look at Jim Naughten’s portfolio.
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Mar 10, 2005

Swiss photographer Marianne Engel takes her photos at night. But it’s quite interesting to see how her night-time photos aren’t the run-of-the-mill night scenes that are so ubiquitous. Or would you have thought of taking photos of flowers at night?
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Mar 9, 2005

Patrizia Di Fiore’s travel photography is not the kind of glossy stuff that you see in travel magazines (pretty much like the places shown in those magazines never look like what in reality). Passages probably is my favourite of the series.
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Mar 1, 2005

Philippe Gronon has moved from abstract b/w photos to a wider range of photography.
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Feb 25, 2005

Corinne Vionnet’s portfolio contains landscapes and interiors many of which feel somewhat unsettling.
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Feb 21, 2005

Gábor Ösz isn’t so much a standard photographer as a visual artist. His projects are well documented and explained even though they’re probably way more impressive in an art museum.
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Feb 18, 2005

Norman Beierle + Hester Keijser are a European couple of artists who have been doing all kinds of projects, including photography. Their latest series from the museums of modern art in Arnhem and Eindhoven (both in Holland) are particularly nice.
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Feb 11, 2005

The photography of Bastien Pons deviates a bit from the contemporary look that I have been featuring here quite often. No teaser, just browse around a little, and see whether you like it. In any case, his photography is quite creative.
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Jan 30, 2005

Pekka Turunen’s portraits show people from his home country, Finland. These might be some of the best environmental portraits that I’ve seen in a while.
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Jan 30, 2005

When I saw Miklos Gaál’s photos for the first time I thought it was quite impressive that he had built these elaborate model sets. It took me a while to realize that the photos don’t show sets but actual places. Quite fascinating!
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Jan 24, 2005

Simon Høgsberg has updated his website, which now prominently features “The Thought Project”. I really like his willingness to venture beyond standard photography and to incoporate his subjects.
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Jan 24, 2005

Niko Luoma’s work is very minimalist and utterly fascinating.
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Jan 24, 2005

Ola Kolehmainen’s work concerns itself with very rigid architectural structures.
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Jan 21, 2005

“Hannah Starkey’s photographs are informed by her own experiences of a woman living and working in a cosmopolitan city. […] To create the images, Starkey uses professional actresses whom she chooses to play the specific roles required in each photograph. Starkey conceives each image as a mise en scene, a narrative fiction of everyday living.” (source; more samples here and here).
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Jan 11, 2005

With more and more photographers aiming for (digital) perfection, doing the complete opposite often results in fascinating results. Guillaume Dimanche’s composites are odd and aesthetically pleasing at the same time.
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Jan 10, 2005

Check out this nice selection of photos by French photographer Laure Bertin.
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Jan 3, 2005

French photographer Patrick Tournebœuf has shot a series of interesting projects, such as deserted vacation spots in Winter and Omaha Beach in 2004 (please note that the website might be a bit sluggish).
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Nov 23, 2004

Xavier Ribas’s photography shows us places that we’re aware of fairly well - as they are so generic. But they somehow appear to be somewhat unsettling when presented this way, especially since many of the photos don’t have any humans in them.
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Nov 8, 2004

Check out Lydia Goldblatt’s “And the Word was God”.
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Nov 4, 2004

Wijnanda Deroo’s interiors remind me a little bit of Candida Höfer’s.
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Oct 30, 2004

I just bought Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin’s book Ghetto. It’s easily one of the finest photography books I’ve ever bought and I’m quite spoiled. The parts of the book are taken from Colors Magazine of which Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin are the editors. I found a few sound clips where they explain their way of work: one, two, three. There are more samples from the book here. Update (30 Oct 04): Online photo magazine ak47.tv features photos from Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin’s new book Mr. Mkhizes Portrait & Other Stories from the New South Africa. The book, which I bought a couple days ago, is very similar in style to the one shown in “Ghetto”. Recommended!
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Oct 4, 2004

Hans Wilschut’s portfolio contains some very interesting night-time shots.
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Sep 29, 2004

If I understand them correctly, Road Zero is a project done collectively by the photographers of Tendance Floue. (first seen at deFocused)
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Sep 28, 2004

Gina Glover has a fairly large set of very nice projects (the page loaded very slowly here, though). I especially like “Seascape” and “Outside Time”.
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Sep 21, 2004

Katharina Bosse has done work on the “new burlesque”. The text on the New Burlesque website, written by some critic, has the following to say: “Her portraits of burlesque dancers, as we will see, reveal a form of sublimated desire underlying this systematic - and ironic - attitude of opposition to established norms, in order to better introduce the disturbing specificity of the photographed subject. New Burlesque thus functions as a system of subverting modernist codes.” Now this is exactly what I thought1 (“Gequirlter Quark wird breit, nicht stark” - J.W.v. Goethe2). 1 That’s irony, of course. Just in case… 2 I don’t know whether Goethe actually said that - my old German teacher claimed he did. Regardless of whether he said it or not it’s my favourite Goethe quote anyway.
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Sep 19, 2004

I like Sivan Lewin’s personal work.
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Sep 5, 2004

Check out Betsie van der Meer’s “Farm” project.
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