Archives

September 2007

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Sep 28

Check out Brea Souders’ portfolio, especially the project Living Water.
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Sep 27

“From Mary, Queen of Scots’ beheading in 1587 to John Joe Amador’s lethal injection in 2007: the styles in execution may have changed, but the death mask, it seems, lives on.” (story)
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Sep 27

Many people know Martin Fuchs only through his journal Journal of a Photographer or as the driving force behind Magnum’s blog. But as the name of his own journal/blog indicates, Martin is a photographer, and his work is well worth the visit. In particular, check out his new project Co-Op City Mon Amour. (updated entry)
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Sep 26

Cara Phillips has been working on documenting the offices of cosmetic surgeons.
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Sep 26

Ofer Wolberger emailed me to tell me about his new blog, Horses Think. Check out his great post about Candida Höfer’s photography!
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Sep 26

“A photograph of a naked anorexic woman appeared on Monday in Italian newspapers and on billboards to highlight the effects of the illness during Milan fashion week while promoting a fashion brand.” (story) You can see the images (plus some commentary) here on Andrew’s blog. The problem I have with this is that I just cannot believe that fashion company really cares about anorexia (of course, they claim they do).
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Sep 26

“Imagine how little news about visual art would appear in the papers if the following generic stories were banned: 1. The most expensive work of art ever […] 2. Anything about graffiti […] 3. Lost masterpiece rediscovered […] 4. Contemporary artists as plagiarists […] 5. Art historian/archaeologist makes earth-shattering discovery […] 6. Restoration stories” (story)
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Sep 25

“This retouching business has gotten to the point where normal beautiful women look hideous next to these frankenbarbies.” observes A Photo Editor
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Sep 25

It seems like commenting hasn’t been working for a while - I have no idea why, I had tested it after setting up my new Movable Type version (and until recently, comments actually showed up). I just fiddled with TypeKey again, and it does seem to work (again). If you run into any trouble commenting (you’ll know when there’s a problem: TypeKey will claim commenting hasn’t been set up correctly), please email me! Update: It does seem to work now, there were a couple of comments coming in. In the future, if you can’t comment (and the system complains about something) please send an email!
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Sep 25

“In March of 1985, Clive Wearing, an eminent English musician and musicologist in his mid-forties, was struck by a brain infection […] affecting especially the parts of his brain concerned with memory. He was left with a memory span of only seconds - the most devastating case of amnesia ever recorded.” (story)
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Sep 24

“Up to 70 percent of first responders are ill as a result of 9/11 contamination. If a similar rate of illness holds true for those who lived and worked near the Twin Towers, the number of seriously ill New Yorkers could climb to 300,000 in the near future.” (story) Also don’t miss this photo series about the same topic.
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Sep 24

Anthony Lane is one of the finest writers New Yorker magazine employs - he typically writes movie reviews (which, unlike most of the movies he discusses, are not to be missed) - and it’s a particular treat to read his article about Leica cameras.
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Sep 24

Check out Clayton Cotterell’s excellent series “Teens”.
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Sep 23

I just watched the documentary Absolut Warhola, which I couldn’t recommend more. It’s a bit like taking away the comedian (and scripting) from Borat and adding Andy Warhol to what’s left.
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Sep 22

“I’m looking for a democratic perfect image of myself. So it is up to you to give me directions how I should change my face and body.” - Go and tell Monique Bergen Henegouwen what to fix next on her blog.
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Sep 21

Natalie Kriwy often supplements her photos with testimonies by her subjects - using either written notes or audio. Make sure to look through all the projects!
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Sep 20

Peter Baker’s Blissfield is a nice portrait of life in small-town America.
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Sep 20

In the Shadow of Horror, SS Guardians Frolic write the New York Times about these photo albums of Auschwitz SS guards. It’s probably quite a bit less surprising to see these photos - not that it does take away from their initial shock value - if one keeps in mind what Hannah Arendt termed the banality of evil.
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Sep 19

Terry Evans’s Steel Work - a portrait of steel mills - is quite nice, especially since it’s in colour.
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Sep 19

It’s too bad that Céline Clanet’s website is only in French - but if you don’t understand French, you can still enjoy the photography.
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Sep 19

Sometimes, it’s quite nice to look at something entirely different, something remote from one’s usual interests. I found two immensely interesting articles on insects today, so I’ll just share them. For those who just love fruit flies (don’t we all?) there’s brain-scanning the fruit fly. And for all the bee lovers out there, check out how bees kill predator hornets.
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Sep 19

Another fine article about Gerhard Richter’s window for the Cologne cathedral. I wasn’t all that surprised to learn that the Archbishop of Cologne, Cardinal Meisner, disapproved of it - after all, this is the same man who just had to apologize for using Nazi language (well, he claims it was taken out of contect, so he didn’t really apologize for what he said).
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Sep 18

In an interview, Thurston Moore describes Northampton, where I now live, as “the centre of a scene that people are calling ‘new weird America’”. As much as any such statement (which includes claims by people only referred to as “people”) needs to be taken with a grain (or two) of salt, I kind of like that description (because it gives living in Northampton this kind of aura - which is probably why TM said that in the first place, but never mind).
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Sep 18

I quite like Nicole Akstein’s portraiture, especially the one above.
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Sep 17

Check out the photography of Dustin Aksland!
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Sep 14

I find Sasha Bezzubov’s Gringo Project and Expats and Natives quite interesting, the latter probably for obvious reasons.
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Sep 13

Seen at lens culture: the photography of Nicholas Hughes - I prefer “In Darkness Visible” over “Egde”.
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Sep 12

Michael Schäfer has spent a lot of time on decoding (if that’s the right word) body language. Check out his Champ series: These poses do strike the viewer as almost ludicrous, but on the other hand, we wouldn’t be surprised to see them in their “proper” context (and then we wouldn’t think they were ludicrous at all).
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Sep 12

… and not be bothered any longer by seeing my first name spelled “Jorg” or “Jorge” or “Jeorg” or “Jeörg” or “Jöerg” or “Joel” or “Jim” (no, I’m not making any of these up)? It’s a bit like Chinese water torture, though. After a while it really gets quite irritating.
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Sep 12

Those interested in seeing large samples from Richard Ross’ Architecture of Authority will find some here, along with an interview with the photographer.
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Sep 11

“Gifted, beautiful and unpredictable, Lee Miller’s career took her from the fashion pages of Vogue to the front line of the second world war. But while she is celebrated as one of the finest photographers of the 20th century, her great talents as a writer are often forgotten” (story)
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Sep 11

I quite like James Rajotte’s work, especially “blasted”.
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Sep 10

“They began jumping not long after the first plane hit the North Tower, not long after the fire started. They kept jumping until the tower fell. They jumped through windows already broken and then, later, through windows they broke themselves. They jumped to escape the smoke and the fire; they jumped when the ceilings fell and the floors collapsed; they jumped just to breathe once more before they died. They jumped continually, from all four sides of the building, and from all floors above and around the building’s fatal wound. […] For more than an hour and a half, they streamed from the building, one after another, consecutively rather than en masse, as if each individual required the sight of another individual jumping before mustering the courage to jump himself or herself. […] They were all, obviously, very much alive on their way down, and their way down lasted an approximate count of ten seconds. They were all, obviously, not just killed when they landed but destroyed, in body though not, one prays, in soul. […] From the beginning, the spectacle of doomed people jumping from the upper floors of the World Trade Center resisted redemption. […] The trial that hundreds endured in the building and then in the air became its own kind of trial for the thousands watching them from the ground. No one ever got used to it; no one who saw it wished to see it again, although, of course, many saw it again. Each jumper, no matter how many there were, brought fresh horror, elicited shock, tested the spirit, struck a lasting blow. Those tumbling through the air remained, by all accounts, eerily silent; those on the ground screamed. […] it was, at last, the sight of the jumpers that provided the corrective to those who insisted on saying that what they were witnessing was ‘like a movie,’ for this was an ending as unimaginable as it was unbearable: Americans responding to the worst terrorist attack in the history of the world with acts of heroism, with acts of sacrifice, with acts of generosity, with acts of martyrdom, and, by terrible necessity, with one prolonged act of - if these words can be applied to mass murder - mass suicide.” (story)
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Sep 7

“The world’s largest photograph will have its premier showing in the Wind Tunnel at Art Center’s South Campus. This landmark photograph, a gelatin silver image that is three stories high by 11 stories wide, was produced in the summer of 2006 using a shuttered Southern California F-18 jet hangar transformed into an enormous camera obscura — the largest camera ever made.” (source) There’s a website about the photo here and a movie about the “making of” here. As much as I find such attempts to create an even larger photo than ever before not all that interesting, I am quite glad to see that it’s not yet another digital photo.
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Sep 7

Robert Lyons’ portfolio is quite diverse, with a lot of work done in Africa. His book Intimate Enemy about the genocide in Rwanda not only portrays survivors and perpetrators, but also provides a lot of background - it’s a must-read for anyone interested in what happened. For more information on Robert’s work, also see this page.
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Sep 6

Talking about Nicole Kidman’s and Maggie Gyllenhaal’s most recent magazine/ad appearances, Kira Cochrane writes: “I think what I find so incredibly discomfiting about these pictures is their suggestion that, no matter how talented a woman is, how many plaudits she has received, how intelligent her reputation, how garlanded she has been for depicting one of the most talented writers of the last century while sporting a huge prosthetic conk on her noggin, at the end of the day, if she wants to stay in the public eye, if she wants the magazine covers and the leading roles, she has to be willing to reduce herself to tits and arse.” If you haven’t seen the photography Kira Cochrane is talking about, see Nicole Kidman’s cover here and one of Maggie Gyllenhaal’s photos here.
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Sep 6

Peter Oehlmann’s photography revolves around the “the documentation of the architectural and environmental transformation of urban and rural areas.” (source) On his own website (German only), you want to look under freie projekte.
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Sep 5

I quite like Nik Mirus’ photography.
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Sep 5

It’s probably just a coincidence that today I came across two discussions of whether/how to teach art. Alec asks Can/should art be taught?, and Ellen Winner and Lois Hetland discuss Art for our sake. Note that they are talking about two different aspects of art education - dedicated art schools and art as part of the general curriculum - but they both make for interesting reads (and food for thought).
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Sep 4

Alec Soth’s blog is one year old today. Happy anniversary, Alec! Ch’ng Yaohong’s Asian Photography Blog is a new, most welcome addition to the blog scene. With so much interesting photography coming out of Asia (and so much of it underrepresented in the West) it’s great to see a blog devoted to it.
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Sep 4

“Over the past decade institutions and public sector organisations within Europe have initiated the use of blue [UV] lighting in certain areas of semi-public space. Specific spaces which intravenous drug users have been known to frequent.” - David Blackmore
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Sep 3

Stefan Jäggi’s portfolio contains a whole bunch of interesting sets.
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Sep 1

The simple principle form follows function can be quite useful when trying to understand architecture: If a building has a certain purpose, then that purpose is expressed via the architecture. Thus, a building that looks like a prison in all likelihood is a prison (even though it might also be something else). As it turns out, in our modern world things appear to be somewhat more complicated. Of course, a confusion like this could mean that applying too simple a principle oversimplifies reality. But we could make things more interesting by assuming that form does indeed follow function and by then asking questions about what we see. Alternatively, we can take a building whose purpose we were told, but which does not really look like what we would have thought it might look like, and start thinking about that. Or, if we don’t feel like theorizing at all, we can look at a building or place and simply ask what kind of impression we get from looking at it. Regardless of how you approach the photography shown in Richard Ross’s Architecture of Authority, you are sure to feel quite uncomfortable about what you see, especially since the journey will take you to infamous places such as the Guantanamo Bay prison and Abu Ghraib.
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