Archives

July 2006

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Jul 31

“In principle, the idea is good, in principle it’s very important that it be executed: the work of sculptor Arno Breker should be exhibited, its creation, aesthetic and political impact should be debated. Breker’s oeuvre, demonised for decades by academics and unduly idealised by others, played, for a few years, a very influential role in German cultural history.” - story
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Jul 31

“Responsibility for the Israeli airstrikes that killed at least 54 civilians sheltering in a home in the Lebanese village of Qana rests squarely with the Israeli military, Human Rights Watch said today. It is the latest product of an indiscriminate bombing campaign that the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) have waged in Lebanon over the past 18 days, leaving an estimated 750 people dead, the vast majority of them civilians. […] Even if the IDF claims of Hezbollah rocket fire from the Qana area are correct, Israel remains under a strict obligation to direct attacks at only military objectives, and to take all feasible precautions to avoid the incidental loss of civilian life. To date, Israel has not presented any evidence to show that Hezbollah was present in or around the building that was struck at the time of the attack.” - story
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Jul 31

Claudia Grassl’s photography is a nice mix of stuff that’s quite popular these days.
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Jul 28

“Equally at home in downtown fetish bars and stylish uptown parties, Robert Mapplethorpe epitomised the decadence of 1980s New York. He died of Aids in 1989, but his perversely beautiful photographs live on, and are again on show in Britain. Peter Conrad meets his brother, lawyer and assistant and explores the legacy of his cruel and unusual relationships.”
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Jul 27

Not to be missed: Be an Expert on Anything by Stephen Colbert.
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Jul 27

Oh, the good old world of powerful men with its built-in disdain of women, given such a high-profile demonstration at the so-called G8 meeting - right out of the “Sexual Harrassment for Dummies” manual. Read about the German reaction, and learn why the incident “might even help Merkel achieve renewed popularity in Germany. A commentator writing in Sunday edition of Germany’s conservative daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung expressed sympathy for Merkel. ‘Then, after a brief moment of deliberation, Bush lowered his head with determination, like a ram, and placed his paws around Merkel’s neck from behind, startling her, making her cringe and raise her hands — profoundly horrified and defenseless to such an extent that we immediately felt lasting sympathy for her.’” No comment.
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Jul 27

At the Dumbo Arts Center, exhibition “Point of Purchase” is opening on July 29 (can’t find a link - see Brian Ulrich’s page). Apart from Brian, who has been one of my favourite photographers for a while (as regular visitors will certainly know), I found two other participants whose work looks very interesting: Stefanie Nagorka builds sculptures at Home Depot. Zoë Sheehan Saldaña creates art involves cross stitching and sewing - have a look! Very cool!
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Jul 27

There’s an exciting new photoblog in town, éclectique, written and compiled by Taylan Özdere.
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Jul 26

For those who feel a bit neglected here since I haven’t linked to grim b/w photography all that much lately, have a look at Gábor Kerekes’ work.
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Jul 25

You can learn more about Chinese performance artist Zhang Huan’s work by reading one of the articles/interviews on his website. Also see this article/interview (and you probably want to treat the cyber-ad that features Add Coulter on that page [provided it shows up] as a kind of absurd, unintended performance art [often mistaken for actual politics]).
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Jul 24

“In his pictures, Ingar Krauss […] traces the secrets of childhood on the threshold to adulthood.” See more samples here. Also see the new feature at lensculture.
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Jul 24

Just a few days after mentioning China’s environmental problems in my review of Edward Burtynsky’s ‘China’, I came across this feature on these problems. If you’re not all that concerned, maybe this quote will make you change your mind: “Scientists in California and the Pacific Northwest have made a startling discovery in recent years. Pollution from China, they say, is degrading the air quality along the West Coast of the United States. Soot, mercury, and acid-rain producing compounds from Chinese power plants and factories have reached such high levels that the pollution is now spreading across the Pacific.”
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Jul 23

“Reading US, Israeli and Arab commentaries and analyses of the current conflicts raging in the Middle East is a disturbing exercise.” - James Zogby
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Jul 21

I’m not all that interested in contributing to the debate who is to blame for the latest war in the Middle East - with both sides causing the deaths of literally hundreds of innocent civilians this is a discussion which I personally find somewhat sickening. I found these images online, of young children writing messages on artillery shells (see above, see the entry at The Guardian’s blog and also this blog entry). If these images do not sum up the essence of why the region is in the state it is in right now, I don’t know what else will (and don’t bother to point out the nationality of the children - you can easily find corresponding images from the other side).
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Jul 20

The success of the Chinese government to transform their country into something highly industrialized and economically powerful can hardly be denied. As a direct consequence, environmental problems in China have exploded, and if the country continues its current course, the consequences for itself and for the whole planet will be desastrous. Jared Diamond’s Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed contains enough details in one of the final chapters, and there is no need (or space) to repeat them here.
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Jul 20

Mark brought this to my attention: “s soon as Adolf Hitler was named chancellor of Germany in 1933, Ernst Leitz II began receiving frantic calls from Jewish associates, asking for his help in getting them and their families out of the country. As Christians, Leitz and his family were immune to Nazi Germany’s Nuremberg laws, which restricted the movement of Jews and limited their professional activities. To help his Jewish workers and colleagues, Leitz quietly established what has become known among historians of the Holocaust as ‘the Leica Freedom Train,’ a covert means of allowing Jews to leave Germany in the guise of Leitz employees being assigned overseas. Employees, retailers, family members, even friends of family members were ‘assigned’ to Leitz sales offices in France, Britain, Hong Kong and the United States.” - story (also see this page)
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Jul 18

Just in case you were/are wondering what those “heavy metal” people could possibly be “singing” about, here is a simple explainer.
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Jul 18

“I took some photos of my kids naked on a camping trip. A drugstore employee called the police - and my family’s life became a living hell.” - story
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Jul 18

Todd Deutsch has been using photography as a means to trace the history of his family while it is happening. His most recent project Gamers shows us the fairly odd world of computer game addicts. (updated entry)
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Jul 17

Rocky Schenck’s b/w photography is almost showing us a different world. For his most recent work see this page. (updated entry)
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Jul 17

Billmon comments on what he calls blood discount.
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Jul 14

Francois Cavelier’s portfolio contains a set of pretty nice projects. It is quite annoying to get pop-up advertizing on the site, though.
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Jul 13

“Is the Guggenheim today’s equivalent of Planet Hollywood?” asks Steve Rose
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Jul 13

Albrecht Tübke mostly specializes in portraiture, even though his “Dalliendorf” project (which I like quite a bit) also features landscapes and still lifes.
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Jul 11

 

2000

Well, what do you know, this is post number 2000. And the blog is exactly 4 years old. Send me gifts! (just kidding)
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Jul 7

Funny, I got GW Bush’s fortune cookie the other day. Must be some sort of mix-up.
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Jul 7

According to this article, Petrina Hicks “personifies much that is typical in contemporary photography. Her work is cool and elegant, with just a slight infusion of humanity.” (just in case you were wondering what what “contemporary photography” is all about)
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Jul 6

“Having just returned to America after a year’s absence, I’m pondering this question: Why is it that the United States, which has not suffered a major terrorist attack at home for more than four years, thinks it’s at war, while the United Kingdom, which was hit by a major terrorist attack just a year ago, does not? […] One of the ‘select patriotic titles’ in the Stanford University bookstore is Faith of my Fathers, a gripping memoir by John McCain, the current front-runner to be Republican presidential candidate in 2008. […] On the last page, he recalls his father passing on what he remembered most from his own father’s last message to him: ‘Son, there is no greater thing than to die for the principles - for the country and the principles that you believe in.’ […] This is a heroic conception of warrior honour which one could have encountered in most European countries before 1914, but which has been little heard in any mainstream European discourse since 1945.” - story
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Jul 5

I couldn’t care less about the soccer world cup, and I find the newly found love of Germans for their flag quite sad (there really is no need to copy every bad habit), but if the big result of the world cup was an end to the endless whining, bitching, and moaning I’m subjected to every time I visit my home country, that would be quite an achievement. Some people really think it’s possible.
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Jul 5

Simon Koy’s most interesting photography can be found under “Projekte”.
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Jul 4

Lovisa Ringborg’s digital manipulations are cleverly done, but as in the case of Loretta Lux’s work, it’s all a bit too candy-like for me.
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Jul 3

Michael Neuhaus’s photography of life in the German Ruhr region probably does not comply with stereotypes of what Germany must be like. Or maybe it does?
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