Archives

November 2003

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Nov 30

Oliver Wasow’s lo-fi webpage contains lots of excellent photos.
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Nov 28

I cannot imagine putting a lot of text, lots of explanations or motivations next to my photos. But that’s all a matter of personal style I suppose. David Plowden seems to feel a need for all those words.
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Nov 27

In The Guardian, George Monbiot write an excellent article about what he calls “The Moral Myth” - those familiar with world history will realize immediately that he is right. His explanation is consistent with what we’ve seen in history and it’s consistent with what we see now - regardless of what the spinmeisters want us to believe. “I do believe that there was a moral case for deposing Saddam […] by violent means. I also believe that there was a moral case for not doing so, and that this case was the stronger. That Saddam is no longer president of Iraq is, without question, a good thing. But against this we must weigh the killing or mutilation of thousands of people; the possibility of civil war in Iraq; the anger and resentment the invasion has generated throughout the Muslim world and the creation, as a result, of a more hospitable environment in which terrorists can operate; the reassertion of imperial power; and the vitiation of international law. It seems to me that these costs outweigh the undoubted benefit. “But the key point, overlooked by all those who have made the moral case for war, is this: that a moral case is not the same as a moral reason. Whatever the argument for toppling Saddam on humanitarian grounds may have been, this is not why Bush and Blair went to war. “A superpower does not have moral imperatives. It has strategic imperatives. Its purpose is not to sustain the lives of other people, but to sustain itself. Concern for the rights and feelings of others is an impediment to the pursuit of its objectives. It can make the moral case, but that doesn’t mean that it is motivated by the moral case. […] “the White House is not a branch of Amnesty International. When it suits its purposes to append a moral justification to its actions, it will do so. When it is better served by supporting dictatorships like Uzbekistan’s, expansionist governments like Ariel Sharon’s and organisations which torture and mutilate and murder, like the Colombian army and (through it) the paramilitary AUC, it will do so. “It armed and funded Saddam when it needed to; it knocked him down when it needed to. In neither case did it act because it cared about the people of his country. It acted because it cared about its own interests. The US, like all superpowers, does have a consistent approach to international affairs. But it is not morally consistent; it is strategically consistent.” full text
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Nov 26

One of those highly specialized niches of photography used to be taking very detailed photos of very small things. With the advent of cheap high-quality flatbed scanners some of these problems disappeared. But things aren’t as straightforward as you’d think. Take coins, for example. Many people collect coins and taking a good photo of a coin is more than just non-trivial. Here’s an article about this.
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Nov 24

Ralf Peters is another emerging German talent.
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Nov 24

Götz Diergarten studied photography at the art academy in Düsseldorf with Bernd Becher. I guess that’s not too hard to guess from looking at his work. I’m going to refrain from discussing whether it really deserves a Hasselblad Foundation grant given that it’s basically re-doing Becher’s work with just very slightly different subjects.
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Nov 24

F.C. Gundlach’s fashion photography hails from mainly the 1950’s and 1960’s.
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Nov 24

This morning, my wife and I were talking about New Yorker magazine (NYM) which has a portrait shot by Richard Avedon in almost each issue. Even though I am a fan of Avedon’s work his latest NYM portraits have consistently disappointed me. I told my wife NYM should really be a bit more imaginative - doesn’t this all tie in with a glaring lack of general imagination that is becoming more and more obvious? - and hire other portrait photographers, especially emerging talents. And then I stumbled upon Koos Breukel’s work - photos that are on par with Avedon’s.
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Nov 24

Today’s edition of utterly fabulous wood s lot features lots of links to work on and by Minor White.
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Nov 21

A little creative fun from the readers of b3ta.com
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Nov 20

Allan Jenkins produces his photos using an old process called cyanotypes, and then toning his images [with tea!]. Read more about “ancient” photographic processes in this overview.
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Nov 20

“Photojournalist Douglass Oster ditched the Nikons to spend a summer documenting small-town life with a vintage 1950s Kodak Brownie Hawkeye in his mother’s home town of Lisbon, Ohio.” (thru consumptive.org)
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Nov 20

Morten Nilsson told me he has just added many more photos tothe “Dancers” section.
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Nov 19

spitting image, another weblog I have been contributing to, is back. Unfortunately, all the old entries are lost, but there’ll be lots of new ones.
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Nov 17

The other day, I was browsing through “American Photo” magazine - a somewhat glorified “special advertizing section”: It’s very hard to tell where the ads start or end. The latest edition has a special about pop star Britney Spears, featuring a series of photos taken by Mark Liddell. Have a look at the product. You get all the ingredients of the fabricated human body - incl. missing nipples (2001) and changing breast sizes (compare the earlier 2000 with the newer 2003).
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Nov 16

The current edition of Colors Magazine is all about photo studios where people can have their portraits taken. They went to nine different studios and, after introducing them, show samples.
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Nov 16

If you try to find links for Robert Polidori you’re being bombarded with search results of book sellers who try to sell either Havana or Chernobyl. Recently, New Yorker magazine published some his work in extended slide shows, one about Dubai, the other one about ruined New Orleans.
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Nov 15

And while at it (where “it” stands for “looking at Italian sites that only speakers of Italian understand”) have a look at Corrado Zeni’s paintings.
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Nov 13

Having solved lots of technical problems - computers make life so much easier, don’t they? - consumptive is up again.
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Nov 10

Roland Fischer is currently featured at Munich’s modern art museum (Pinakothek der Moderne).
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Nov 10

carte blanche pedicure just got re-designed and re-located. If you haven’t had a look at it before now’s the time!
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Nov 10

Read what seems to be the conclusion of a somewhat bizarre struggle about a 65-year old article about Adolf Hitler’s home. Note how all the usual suspects get involved.
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Nov 10

Photographs of human settlements or building with no human beings in them often evoke strange feelings. In the worst case, they just don’t look real. In the best case, they move something within us. David Heald’s “Architecture of Silence” belongs to the latter.
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Nov 7

Due to popular request: Simon Ladefoged’s work.
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Nov 7

In Flak Magazine, Noam Lupu argues that “the [ICP’s] first triennial is a missed opportunity to bring to the fore questions about the nature of photography and, more importantly, how artists use the medium to evoke a range of contemporary issues.” (article)
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Nov 7

2lazy4, Parisians Camille and François, are maybe trying a little bit too hard to be hip but, nevertheless, their site is very nice. They got some very cool “toy camera” photography in their galleries. I wish in their Sunburst series they had taken care of the light leaks. It’s almost as if people think you need a certain kind of toy-camera credibility so you don’t fix those light leaks and if you do you’re not cool. I think it’s this sort of attitude that makes me not identify myself as a toy-camera photographer even though in fact I am using lots of “toy” cameras. (thru gmtPlus9)
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Nov 7

Seems like there’s a new website dedicated to the Diana Camera. So far, there are three galleries up - Dominic Turner’s is my favourite.
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Nov 5

Look At Me might be the nicest collection of found photographs I’ve ever seen. And you can submit photos, too!
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Nov 3

 

Oh…

I just noted that I did not receive any emails when somebody posted a comment - trying to rid myself of Sobig worm emails I also got comment notifications deleted. I’m in the process of looking through the most recent entries to see what people wrote. I think I got the problem under control now (oh, how gloriously deluded a computer user can be!). Just two comments: First, the official language here is English. So if you post a comment in any other language - regardless of whether I’m able to understand it or not [and that includes my native langauge] - it’ll be deleted. Sorry, folks! Second, if you write offensive comments - which I define simply as comments that contain offensive language, regardless of whether you agree with me or not - stuff will get deleted, too.
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