Archives

June 2003

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Jun 30

A fotolog using Polaroids. (also thru oink!)
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Jun 30

Chien Chi Chang’s photo project The Chain - photos of inmates of a mental institution in Taiwan who are being held chained together - is online at Magnum.
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Jun 29

Martin Herbert discusses Outsider Art and ‘Insider’ Art. (thru artnotes) PS: I wish he had made the following sentence the first sentence of his essy: “It’s a safe bet that Sam Taylor-Wood has never cleaned a toilet in her life.” That would have been priceless.
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Jun 28

Excellent minimalistic photography by Amanda Marchand.
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Jun 28

Today, I started reading Michel Houellebecq’s novel “Platform” in its German translation (it’s due to be released in an English translation in a few weeks btw). Having read - and enjoyed - The Elementary Particles I was hoping for a similar litarary feast and I think I will not be disappointed (this is being written being around 100 pages into the book).
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Jun 27

Boring postcards are actually not that boring at all! (thru thingsmagazine.net)
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Jun 26

“Jillian Edelstein attended the hearings of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission and returned with startling images of the perpetrators of the worst horrors of apartheid and their victims.” A 24-page essay, adapted from the book “Truth and Lies”, can be downloaded as a pdf file. (thru coldtype.net)
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Jun 25

iconomy has a link to Binh Danh’s Chlorophyll Art . Seeing that I remembered having read an article about this before called Why didn’t the Romans invent Photography? In that article, there is a little modification to what Binh Danh does: The article suggests to put the leave into a dark box for two days. Given it has been so sunny over the past few days I might even try this kind of photography!
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Jun 25

(thru fatshadow.com)
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Jun 25

Taryn Simon’s “The Innocents” is on show at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center until August 2003: “In the summer of 2000, Simon was assigned by the New York Times Magazine to photograph men who were wrongfully convicted, imprisoned, exonerated and subsequently freed from death row. This project inspired her to apply for and be awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship in Photography to travel across the United States photographing and interviewing individuals who were unfairly convicted.” More about the show: Mrs Simon’s foreword for her book, a review in Village Voice, a review on alternet.org (originally in LA Weekly). Update (17 July 2003): The book “The Innocents” is available through Umbrage Books. And there also is a website for The Innocence Project with a lot of background information. The new image and the two links were kindly provided by Andrea Dunlop (Umbrage Books).
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Jun 25

Aernout Overbeeke is a Dutch advertizing photographer with quite an interesting portfolio.
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Jun 24

Chim - The Photographs of David Seymour shows the work of the Magnum co-founder whose work, quite unfortunately I think, doesn’t quite get the same attention as that of, say, Henri Cartier-Bresson.
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Jun 24

Rondal Partidge, son of Imogen Cunningham, had a very early start into photography. “Partridge began helping his mother in the darkroom at the age of five. At seventeen he became Dorothea Lange’s apprentice, driving her up and down the back roads of California as she created her well-known images of migrant laborers.” Later, he worked with Ansel Adams. In 1940, he worked on a series called “california Youth” - a lot of which is online.
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Jun 24

We are still obsessed with Saddam Hussein, America’s current nemesis, despite his disappearance. Now that there don’t seem to be any of those “weapons of mass destructions” (which, curiously enough, never include those weapons the US uses so frequently such as, for example, cluster bombs or the bomb somebody - in a truly Saddamian fashion of mind - called “daisy cutters”) the rationale for war has shifted away from them. Now Iraq has been invaded to liberate the Iraqis from their tyrant and to bring freedom, democracy, and human rights. This is not the place to discuss what is meant by the freedom and democracy those Iraqis might get. As the leader of the invasion troops, Mr Franks, said “freedom is not free” (link). So let’s not be petty.
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Jun 22

The Photography of Charles Sheeler was shown at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (3 June 2003 - 17 August 2003).
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Jun 22

“It is really extraordinary that there have so far been virtually no independent studies of the health effects of GM. What there is has mostly been done by the companies themselves. We are constantly told that there is no evidence of any greater health risk from a GM crop than from its non-GM counterpart. What is not added is that there have been no health checks to find out. Indeed, the only Government-sponsored work ever carried on the health impacts of GMOs was Dr Pusztai’s work on rats and GM potatoes, and then, when it found negative effects, it was widely rubbished in government circles, even though his paper had been peer-reviewed six times before publication.” (story) Update: Mr Cieciel sent me this link which points to a document which includes known hazards and problems with GM food. It’s a scary read - even scarier is the fact that in the US, companies are not required to label their GM food unless they want to.
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Jun 22

Tod Seelie is a photographer from Brooklyn. I especially like the Road 02 gallery.
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Jun 22

“Not Neutral: Contemporary Swiss Photography presents the work of nine artists, including better-known figures such as Annelies Štrba and Ugo Rondinone. Also featured are emerging photographers such as Daniele Buetti, Hans Danuser, Katrin Freisager, Claudio Moser, Cat Tuong Nguyen, Marco Poloni, and Peter Tillessen. […] Not Neutral […] is on view at NYUÂ’s Grey Art Gallery from April 15 through July 19, 2003.” (many thanks, Mr Cieciel!) Update: There’s an extensive site with tons of photos by Daniele Buetti here.
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Jun 21

[I’m going to attempt to describe something which is probably indescribable given my limitations as a writer. Nevertheless, I felt it has to be done.] In one of Thomas Bernhard’s novels, the narrator he had to get away from the places where he grew up, the places which he hates, to be able to get closer to them.
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Jun 21

All about Japanese superheroes (incl. some incredibly goofy music!). (thru geisha asobi blog)
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Jun 20

There’s a lot of good stuff on Bertold Steinhilber’s website. I’m almost reluctant to single out something.
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Jun 20

Susanne Friedrich has an amazing gallery of images taken with a “Holga” toy camera at night.
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Jun 20

Very nice gallery of colourful night-time photography at thenocturnes.com (also see previous entry).
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Jun 18

Rap battle between Weebl and Wee Bull.
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Jun 16

Swiss photographer Olivier Christinat has a very unique and deadpan style. It’s quite amazing.
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Jun 16

Margaret Atwood about George Orwell
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Jun 14

A cool site with tons of old Bollywood LP covers. Pictured above: Gumnaam, a spectacular feast for the senses (albeit a long one).
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Jun 12

For her new album “Bare” Annie Lennox decided to bare it all. I don’t know why she thinks she has to compete with the likes of Cristina Aguilera. But then what do I know about music and the music industry? Maybe female singers who want to reach large audiences have to strip. Anyway, in Mrs Lennox’ case some of that photography she got done went horribly wrong. When I ran across the cover of “Bare” - by chance - I almost couldn’t believe how unflattering and bad the photography is. She looks like an unwrapped mummy. The fan page Eurythmistan has more photos from the session some (but not all) of which are grotesquely bad (especially this one and this one). And this hasn’t anything to do with Mrs Lennox herself. Whoever decided on that makeup must have been on crack.
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Jun 12

On the WHO’s website, there’s a page with photos to download. It’s a very odd page because on the left-hand side it shows WHO officials and on the right-hand side it shows some amazing photos of Mental Health Patients. And as if this combination wasn’t odd enough when you click on those thumbnails you get huge versions of the photos (by ‘huge’ I mean huge). The photos are very moving - and I’m not talking about the officials’ ones.
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Jun 12

You gotta be a bit skeptical when a corporation tries to give itself an edge by dealing with social issues. Benetton has probably pushed the limits quite a bit with its advertizing campaigns. Regardless of what you think of Benetton you should check out Colors - their online magazine. The current edition (56) is about violence. Excellent photojournalism, very well done.
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Jun 11

I don’t know what to make of French photographer Bettina Rheims. Her photographic skills are quite good but, unfortunately, quite often she goes for what people might attribute to questionable taste or, at least, to an overly generous use of cliches.
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Jun 11

Index Magazine has a full list of interviews online, incl. but not limited to, Aphex Twin, Autechre, Naomi Klein, Rem Koolhaas, Parker Posey, and Wolfgang Tillmanns.
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Jun 11

Jürgen Teller won this year’s Citibank Photography Prize. Here’s an interview with him from The Gaurdian (which The Guardian hasn’t retracted, yet), and if you want it quirky why don’t you check out (Umlaut heavy) Jürgen Teller interviewing Björk?
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Jun 11

There’s a large collection of contemporary Czech photographers on the target=”_blank”Prague House of Photography’s website. I don’t really want to single out any of them - just go and browse yourself!
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Jun 11

A great collection of Bollywood posters, there are literally hundreds of them. (thru iconomy)
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Jun 10

Nice gallery of works by Bulgarian duo Boris Missirkov and Georgi Bogdanov (that’s not them above!). In Bulgaria, they have their own TV programme.
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Jun 8

“JK Rowling is the sub-literary analogue of Tony Blair.” “Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand […] has a huge reputation as a masterpiece, but I found it to be a fascist tirade about how wonderful American tycoons are in business.” “When I was 14, I expected Mein Kampf to be really disturbing; a charismatic evil genius would have a very dynamic view of the world. But when I finally bought it, it was as interesting as reading a bus timetable.” “A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking […] was unreadable and who cares, anyway? I’d heard so much about it. I borrowed a copy from a friend and tried to read it. Christ Almighty, what crap.” and more dissings of famous books by not-quite-equally famous British people.
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Jun 8

“Do photographs bring us closer to the ‘real’ or push it further away? When is a photograph a document and when is it art?” asks Peter Conrad in an article for The Observer. The exhibiton he refers to I mentioned earlier. (thru esthet.org)
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Jun 7

Today, I came across Michael Kenna’s work - probably the most well-known exponent of this style of work.
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Jun 7

I remember how my life changed when I listened to Mrs Miller for the first time. My musical innocence was gone. Now comes Wing and it’s like Mrs Miller coming alive again. Make sure you check out her rendition of “Yesterday Once More”.
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Jun 7

Happy 1st Birthday, Weebl and Bob!. And don’t forget to check out Wee-Lo.
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Jun 6

A photo essay about drag queens in Tokyo by Kyle Sackowski. (thru consumptive.org)
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Jun 6

New Yorker Magazine’s latest edition fetaures a short story by Haruki Murakami entitled “The Folklore of Our Times”.
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Jun 5

African Aperture has some very nice galleries of photos taken in Africa. There are so many photos and photographers on there that it literally takes forever to look at all of it.
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Jun 5

Exhibition with photos taken in defeated Germany in 1945. Unfortunately, the number of photos which can be found online is pretty small. But they’re quite stunning.
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Jun 5

The Deutsches Historisches Museum (German Historical Museum) has a very interesting exhibition about “Bildberichterstatterinnen” - that’s how the Nazis called female photo journalists. The exhibition shows the work of Liselotte Purper between 1937 and 1944, depicting the Nazis’ view of the role and work of women. Unfortunately, the text of the exhibition is in German. But even if you don’t understand German you can still look at the photos which are very interesting in themselves (all the photos are thumbnails, click on them to see large versions).
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Jun 5

Kodak never was more stylish than this. (thru solipsistic)
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Jun 4

“On August 10, 1945, the day after the bombing of Nagasaki, Yosuke Yamahata began to photograph the devastation.” (link)
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Jun 4

photojapan.com offers stock photography of everything and anything Japanese (incl. vintage photos). If you feel like simple browsing and looking at lots of photos go and have a look!
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